You can get a new smartphone for half off at AT&T this week

Trade-in required, as is a two-year service commitment

AT&T kicked off a smartphone trade-in deal today that knocks 50% off the price of several of the newest smartphones -- including the iPhone 5 and Samsung Galaxy S4 -- subject to a new two-year agreement.

AT&T kicked off a smartphone trade-in deal on Monday that knocks 50% off the price of several of the newest smartphones -- including the iPhone 5 and Samsung Galaxy S4 -- subject to a new two-year agreement.

The offer lasts only through Sunday, June 30, and is available either online or in-store. Activation fees are also waived during the offer. The discount applies with the trade-in of a current smartphone.

Also, AT&T's offer applies to smartphones that cost up to $199.99, which eliminates some versions of the iPhone 5 and Galaxy S4 that have storage above 16GB.

In addition, AT&T is now offering the iPhone 4 for free with waived activation, but only on the Web, and subject to a two-year agreement. Other phones in the half off program include 50% off the BlackBerry Q10 and the HTC One.

Carriers have been known to offer various smartphones at heavy discounts for brief periods usually to spur sales when inventory is high. The latest AT&T offer is unusual because it includes a number of different and new smartphones, not just one or two.

Asked about the current offer, an AT&T spokesman said, "We do promotions like this all the time. It's business as usual."

This article, You can get a new smartphone for half off at AT&T this week, was originally published at Computerworld.com.

Matt Hamblen covers mobile and wireless, smartphones and other handhelds, and wireless networking for Computerworld. Follow Matt on Twitter at @matthamblen or subscribe to Matt's RSS feed. His email address is mhamblen@computerworld.com.

See more by Matt Hamblen on Computerworld.com.

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This story, "You can get a new smartphone for half off at AT&T this week" was originally published by Computerworld .

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