iPad 5 rumor rollup for the week ending Sept. 17

Oct. 15 formula, feel the love, 64-bit forecast, look-alikes

The iOSphere is thrilled to a report, or more accurately to gossip that forecasts Oct. 15 as the date on which the iPad 5 and iPad mini 2 will be revealed in all their glory. Last year, the first iPad mini was unveiled Oct. 23, so Halloween comes early this year.

Also this week: a look at anti-reflective display technology in an Apple patent and how Apple could gain the love of hate-filled consumers by using it in the next iPads; the daring prediction that the Next iPads will, like the iPhone 5S, have 64-bit processors; and new photos show how the new iPads will be identical except for their size.

You read it here second.

The big rumor for the iPad Mini 2 is that it will go retina. Personally, I think that there needs to be a second half to this rumor — a nice surprise in the iPad Mini 2′s price. Apple can ill afford to jack up the price of the iPad Mini 2, even with a retina display, so I predict that Tim Cook will brag about how they added retina to the Mini 2 but kept the price the same. (Thanks ahead of time, Timmy, but the iPad Mini should have been under $300 in the first place.) The real challenge for Apple this year will be to see if they can rekindle mainstream interest in the iPad proper, and not have the iPad Mini continue to cannibalize sales.

— Michael “Mikey” Nace, editor, iPhone5NewsBlog, explaining in zero-sum logic how the “real challenge” for Apple now is make the full-size iPad more successful because the mini keeps cannibalizing sales despite Apple’s huge mistake in pricing it over $300.

iPad 5 to be announced Oct. 15

In astounding display of rumor hubris, an offhand comment has almost the entire iOSphere in thrall to the conviction that the iPad 5 and iPad mini 2 will be announced on Tuesday, Oct. 15.

The date was contained in the third paragraph, of a three-paragraph post [via Google Translate] at the French-language Apple fan site MacGeneration.  

[MORE: 20 essential business apps for iPhone and iPad]

The headline is “Stocks at the lowest [for] iMac and a special event on October 15th” and leads with a claim that the next iMac will be in short supply. It ends with this: “According to the latest gossip, Apple held a special event again around October 15. The Cupertino company will present the new iPad - as she takes the opportunity to say a word about the Mac Haswell?”

MacGeneration gives no hint as to where it heard this gossip.

Mark Gurman cleverly inverted that post (and displayed his grasp of French by using the word “rumeur”) and elevated “gossip” into “information” and even a “report.” Here’s the headline to his own post at 9to5Mac: “Rumeur: Apple’s next event to be held on October 15th?”

“According to France-based MacGeneration, which has offered both accurate and inaccurate information in the past, Apple’s next media event will be held on Tuesday, October 15th,” Gurman writes. “Apple is expected to debut a series of new products by the end of this year, including multiple new iPad models, several new Macs, OS X Mavericks, and perhaps an update to Apple TV hardware.”

9to5Mac was only one of an endless flock of Websites wondering, proclaiming, contemplating, debating, “reporting,” and disparaging a date proclaimed by its originator as nothing but “gossip.”

Maybe the gossip formula was “Increment by one month the iPhone 5S announcement date and add five.” Which makes as much sense as anything.

iPad 5 will have anti-reflective display and thereby gain the love of consumers

The “news” of the anti-reflective display follows the well-known and well-worn iOSphere pattern of taking any Apple patent application and applying to the Next iDevice.

PatentlyApple posted a summary of the patent in question, for which the application was filed in late 2012.

It apparently uses a “UV mask that includes an anti-reflection film and a UV absorption film to prevent reflections from the mask to the mother glass [of the display],” according to PatentlyApple’s Jack Purcher.

Reducing reflectivity in a display is actually an area where Apple, and other vendors, can create a big improvement in the “viewability” of the screen. Light reflects not only off the cover glass, but off the various layers of the actual display assembly. Reducing that makes a display more visible in bright light, including outdoors.

But that isn’t enough for some in the iOSphere.

“A new recently discovered patent filed by Apple suggests that the next iPad could come equipped with a much needed anti-reflective screen,” says Radu Tyrsina, writing at the clickbait site, iPadForums

“Of course, there currently are third-party anti-glare products that you can use with your iPad or iPhone, but Apple could gain the love of consumers and probably the confidence of investors if they decide to deploy this technology with the next iPads,” he explains confidently.

It’s easy to understand how it all came about….

Tim Cook: Damn it! Consumers hate us and investors don’t have any confidence in us. What can we do?

Jonathan Ive: Just use anti-glare technology in the iPad screen.

Tim Cook: You’re a genius!

iPad 5 will have 64-bit A7X chip

Another thrilling chapter in the iOSphere’s Penetrating Insight Into the Mind of Apple.

Just one example is Erik Pineda’s post for International Business Times, which goes on, and on and on, about how the iPad 5 will certainly have a 64-bit chip.

He’s basing this on a CNET post, by Brooke Crothers, who actually talked to a chip analyst and argues that the 64-bit A7 in iPhone 5S was “necessary” and “meaningful.”

Pineda calls Crothers’ opinion post a “report” and assures us that the A7 is “likely paving the way for the same chip architecture to be found on the iPad 5 and the Retina-laced iPad Mini 2 on release date.”

What was Pineda expecting? That having beaten the entire industry to the punch with a 64-bit mobile chip in iPhone 5S, Apple would then decide to not incorporate a version of it in the next iPad?

Crothers doesn’t address the Next iPad directly, but he argues that the “what 64-bit gets me” is “a future iPad” or some other Apple device that can address more than the 4GB of memory addressable by a 32-bit chip.

The A7 doesn’t gain in memory addressability; but it does gain performance benefits by using features of the ARMv8 instruction set, features not available to 32-bit ARM-based processors. What that also enables is a mobile computer that has the capabilities of a desktop computing architecture, increasingly able to be not merely a “content consumer” but a “content creator,” in conjunction with a growing array of cloud services.

iPad 5 will look just like the iPad mini 2…except, you know, bigger

The indefatigable Australian whatever-he-is Sonny Dickson posted a pile of new photos showing what he says are the iPad 5 and the iPad mini 2 in relationship to each other. 

As you can see from photos like this one, the two devices look apparently completely identical except for their overall dimensions.

Dickson apparently still hasn’t been able to get his hands on a ruler Down Under because, as usual, he doesn’t bother to add details like…exactly what are the dimensions of the two new tablets?

What's actually more interesting is the photos he posted last week, showing what appears to be the iPad 5 with the existing fourth-generation iPad. If this is the new tablet’s exterior, it is indeed slightly narrower than the current iPad. But, again, Dickson hasn't bothered to do the obvious thing measure the gift he's been given.

John Cox covers wireless networking and mobile computing for Network World.http://twitter.com/johnwcoxnwwjohn_cox@nww.com

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