iPad 3G Teardown: An Overview

Both the 3G and the Wi-Fi have some room for gear, say those who've dissected the tablets.

Apple fans might want to look the other way -- this post contains links to photos that may be disturbing to some readers.

The iPad 3G was released to consumers on Friday, 93 days after it was announced and the self repair site ifixit wasted no time dismantling a unit for a "teardown."

The site says the outside of unit is pretty much identical to the WiFi version of the device. The only differentiating factor is a black plastic RF window at the top back of the unit.

"The 3G iPad is not nearly as barren as the Wi-Fi-only iPad, but it's still not jam-packed," teardown author Walter Galan writes.

Once inside, the obvious differences are the 3G chip, SIM card board, and an antenna that is attached to the display assembly.

What does it all mean?

You can purchase 3G service from AT&T for $15 a month for 250MB of data, or $30 per month for unlimited use. (DUH.)

Other news is quietly spreading across the Web as users report their iPad 3G experiences.

Engadget is reporting that iTunes previews and Netflix are downsampled over 3G and ABC player doesn't work at all prompting a message stating: "Please connect to a Wi-Fi network to use this application. Cellular networks are not supported at this time."

There is good news.

Gizmodo tests note that the GPS unit on the iPad 3G is more accurate than the one found in the iPhone 3GS, although it is "much slower to pull a final GPS lock."

Did you get your hands on a 3G iPad? If so, what do you think?

Check back for continuing iPad coverage.

See ifixit's 3G iPad teardown and earlier Wi-Fi iPad teardown.

This story, "iPad 3G Teardown: An Overview" was originally published by PCWorld .

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