NASA satellite may have found water on Mars

NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spots evidence of possible Mars water flows

mars ware?
Could some sort of briny water be flowing on Mars during its warm season? Seems that may be the case as NASA today said its red planet-orbiting satellite spotted possible flowing water, furthering the idea that Mars has or still does harbor life.

The results from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter are the closest scientists have come to finding evidence of liquid water on the planet's surface, NASA said. Frozen water, however has been detected near the surface in many middle to high-latitude regions.

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NASA today said: "Dark, finger-like features appear and extend down some Martian slopes during late spring through summer, fade in winter, and return during the next spring. Repeated observations have tracked the seasonal changes in these recurring features on several steep slopes in the middle latitudes of Mars' southern hemisphere.   Some aspects of the observations still puzzle researchers, but flows of liquid brine fit the features' characteristics better than alternate hypotheses. Saltiness lowers the freezing temperature of water.  Sites with active flows get warm enough, even in the shallow subsurface, to sustain liquid water that is about as salty as Earth's oceans, while pure water would freeze at the observed temperatures."

NASA went on to say images show flows are only about 0.5 to 5 yards or meters wide, with lengths up to hundreds of yards. The width is much narrower than previously reported gullies on Martian slopes. However, some of those locations display more than 1,000 individual flows. Also, while gullies are abundant on cold, pole-facing slopes, these dark flows are on warmer, equator-facing slopes.

"The best explanation for these observations so far is the flow of briny water," said Alfred McEwen of the University of Arizona, Tucson in a statement. McEwen is the principal investigator for the orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) and lead author of a report about the recurring flows published in Thursday's edition of the journal Science.

Follow Michael Cooney on Twitter: nwwlayer8  

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