Apple's Eddy Cue takes firm control over iOS Maps

Now that Scott Forstall is on his way out, command of the Maps team has now fallen into the hands of Eddy Cue, seemingly Apple's go-to guy when it comes to fixing up software that initially fell below expectations

As time marches forward, the release of Apple's Maps app may soon be remembered more as the piece of software that led to the unceremonious exit of Scott Forstall than as an app that was riddled with problems and perhaps released too soon.

In his apology letter to iPhone 5 users, Apple CEO Tim Cook said that Apple "will keep working non-stop until Maps lives up to the same incredibly high standard" users have come to expect from Apple. And since then, Apple has reportedly had its Maps team working long hours while also trying to recruit former Google Maps employees to help shore up holes in Apple's own offering.

What's more, now that Forstall is on his way out, command of the Maps team has now fallen into the hands of Eddy Cue, seemingly Apple's go-to guy when it comes to fixing up software that initially fell below expectations.

The Wall Street Journal reports:

Apple has continued to work to fix the bugs in its mapping software. The maps team is now under senior vice president for Internet software and services, Eddy Cue, who also oversees products like iTunes and iCloud. Mr. Cue has been hands-on with the maps team and participates in regular meetings to fix the product, according to a person familiar with the matter.

And as Apple attempts to improve its Maps app, looming in the rear view mirror is Google, who is reportedly hard at work coming up with a standalone Maps app for iOS.

Google has distributed a test version of its new mapping app that will work on Apple's iPhones to some individuals outside the company, said a person with direct knowledge of the matter. Google has been putting the finishing touches on the app before submitting it for approval to the Apple iTunes store, this person said, though it's unclear exactly when that will happen.

There has been speculation that Apple may reject a standalone Google Maps app or, perhaps more likely, keep it perpetually "under review." That, however, doesn't seem likely if only for the PR backlash that would inevitably result.

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