Conflicting reports highlight problem with Apple speculation

On the day before Apple posted its Q2 2013 earnings, two reports surfaced online that highlight the speculative and often contradictoray nature of Apple reporting.

With Apple about to release its earnings for the quarter gone by in just about an hour or so, two reports that surfaced online yesterday highlight the speculative and often contradictory nature of Apple reporting.

Lately, reporting about Apple has been abysmal. If you ignore Apple's actual numbers, you might think that Apple is just a step away from bankruptcy, their products completely overtaken by the competition. The reality, however, is much different.

Highlighting the discrepancy in Apple-based reporting, let's take a look at two separate articles that made the rounds yesterday.

The first article comes courtesy of Reuters. The headline there reads, "Slowdown in Apple orders weighs on LG Display's first-quarter profit".

Sounds like demand for Apple products is on the wane, right? After all, the article articulates:

LG Display Co Ltd reported its smallest profit since it returned to the black in the second quarter of last year, as demand for iPhone and iPad screens from Apple weakened amid concerns the U.S. company is losing its luster in the mobile device market.

But now let's take a look at a completely different story, this one from the Wall Street Journal. Their headline, on the exact same topic, reads, "LG Display Gets Boost from Apple".

LG Display Co. swung to a net profit in the first quarter as tablet screen sales to Apple increased, and analysts said the South Korean display maker's fortunes this year will be closely tied to demand for the U.S. company's gadgets.

Same story, completely different take. 

Indeed, with Apple's stock now near 52-week lows, one wonders if there have been insiduous efforts to keep shares of Apple as low as possible. While that may seem incredulous, take a look at Philip Elmer DeWitt's pieces on alleged rumors that folks want Apple CEO Tim Cook gone, not to mention some more shady behavior from Samsung.

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