Apple and DOJ offer closing arguments in e-book price-fixing case

After a two-week trial that saw Apple executives and a number of publishing big wigs take the stand, both Apple and the DOJ on Thursday made their closing arguments before U.S. District Judge Denise Cote.

After a two-week trial that saw Apple executives and a number of publishing big wigs take the stand, both Apple and the DOJ on Thursday made their closing arguments before U.S. District Judge Denise Cote.

According to All Things D, which has done a stellar job covering the proceedings, Apple lead counsel Orin Snyder explained during his closing argument that the DOJ simply failed to meet its legal burden in proving that Apple colluded with publishers to raise the price of e-books.

Indeed, Snyder argued that the heated and fast-paced negotiations Apple engaged in with publishers were completely lawful and no different from other types of negotiations Apple conducts.

"Apple did not conspire with a single publisher to fix prices in the e-book industry," Synder explained.

Synder also added that if Apple comes up on the losing end of this case, it would have a "chilling and confounding effect not only on commerce, but through content markets across the country. ... We submit a ruling against Apple on this record sets a dangerous precedent."

The last slide in Apple's final presentation read, "It's time to close the book on this case."

In an interview not too long ago, Apple CEO Tim Cook called the trial "bizarre" while noting that Apple wasn't going to settle the case because, as a matter of principle, they're not going to admit to do something that they didn't do.

A decision from Judge Cote is expected in the next week or two.

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