Apple secures import ban against Samsung devices

Just days after President Obama vetoed an ITC import ban against older generation iPhones and iPads, Apple has secured an import ban against certain Samsung products found to infringe upon Apple's own patents.

Just days after President Obama vetoed an ITC import ban against older generation iPhones and iPads, Apple has secured an import ban against certain Samsung products found to infringe upon Apple's own patents.

Just like the ITC ruling against Apple, this ITC ruling is final and can only be worked around via a Presidential veto.

Apple and Samsung, of course, were quick to offer up reactions to the ruling. Apple, naturally, praised the decision as one that protects real innnovation. Samsung, on the other hand, expressed disappointement and promised to continue launching innovative products in the future. It's worth pointing out that Samsung also added that they "have already taken measures to ensure tha tall of our products will continue to be available in the United States."

While it's nice for Apple to win one, it doesn't appear that the import ban will affect any notable Samsung products. For instance, the ruling mentions that the  Samsung's Continuum SCH-1400 and Transform SPH-M920 were both found to be infringing.

As for the patented technologies at issue, there are two to consider.

One patent encompasses a "touch screen device, method, and graphical user interface for determining commands by applying heuristics. The other patent covers "audio I/O headset plug and play detection circuitry."

Barring a Presidential veto, the ban will go into effect in 60 days.

As for whether or not Samsung might receive the same veto treatment from President Obama as Apple, it doesn't seem likely. Remember that the patents wielded by Samsung are subject to FRAND, meaning that Samsung is obligated to license them out to Apple on fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory terms. In contrast, the patents asserted by Apple are not part of any technological standard and don't need to be licensed out to Samsung, or anyone for that matter, at all.

The ruling can be read below.

ITC final determination in Apple vs. Samsung

via CNET

Join the Network World communities on Facebook and LinkedIn to comment on topics that are top of mind.
Must read: Hidden Cause of Slow Internet and how to fix it
Notice to our Readers
We're now using social media to take your comments and feedback. Learn more about this here.