NASA space photo shows incredible light disparity between North and South Korea

North Korea almost entirely in the dark in International Space Station shot

The International Space Station recently took a snapshot of the Korean peninsula that explicitly details the night-time power consumption of North and South Korea - North Korea is almost completely dark.

From NASA: "The darkened land appears as if it were a patch of water joining the Yellow Sea to the Sea of Japan. The capital city, Pyongyang, appears like a small island, despite a population of 3.26 million (as of 2008). The light emission from Pyongyang is equivalent to the smaller towns in South Korea. Coastlines are often very apparent in night imagery, as shown by South Korea's eastern shoreline. But the coast of North Korea is difficult to detect. These differences are illustrated in per capita power consumption in the two countries, with South Korea at 10,162 kilowatt hours and North Korea at 739 kilowatt hours."

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NASA said the photo is oriented toward the north and the brightest lights are coming from Seoul.  There are 25.6 million people in the Seoul metropolitan area-more than half of South Korea's citizens.

NASA

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