Personalizing the Web browsing experience

* Kynetx provides both server- and client-side tools that use identity data to slice, dice and personalize Web browsing

Kynetx co-founders Phil Windley (CTO) and Stephen Fulling (CEO) passed through last week but I did manage to grab a few words with them to see how the company, and the product (which I called "a greasemonkey-like scripting tool" last spring) were doing.

Kynetx co-founders Phil Windley (CTO) and Stephen Fulling (CEO) passed through last week but I did manage to grab a few words with them to see how the company, and the product (which I called "a greasemonkey-like scripting tool" last spring) were doing.

They had just come away from their first developers' conference, Kynetx Impact, which was a sold-out event. The attendees, almost all developers, came away excited according to Windley. They've formed a developer organization -- the kynetx developer connection -- whose home page carries the headline "Welcome to the context revolution." You know I've got to love that!

In a nutshell (as Fulling demonstrated for me quite effectually), Kynetx provides both server- and client-side tools that can, through the use of identity data, slice, dice and personalize the Web browsing experience for it's users.

For identity data (and other personal attributes), Kynetx integrates with Information Cards from Microsoft's CardSpace as well as the other third-party cards supported by the Information Card Foundation. Through their partnership with Azigo (a Kynetx value-added reseller) and through them with the American Automobile Association (AAA), for example, members of AAA searching on Google or Yahoo (or other search engines) for goods and services will see an AAA logo next to any dealers offering discounts to AAA members.

But it isn't only membership that's highlighted. Fuller also showed me another application, which used geo-locationing to highlight search results that were local to where the search occurred (or any other point you wanted to pick for centering).

The possibilities are endless. Suppose that you have red hair. Further suppose (not a stretch) that you don't have time to go from store to store to find the right clothes, but you want to "dress to impress". Shopping online is quick and easy but it's hard to get the right colors and shades to go with your hair. Someone could develop an app, which: a) acquired your hair color from your personal data store; b) found from a fashion coordinator's site the right colors for you; then c) checked the colors available from shops within your search parameters to highlight only those offering clothing in the right colors, and the right size (which is also read from your personal data store). Quick and easy becomes a no-brainer!

There's so much more that can be done, though.

* Restaurants that are near your location that don't need a reservation and serve the dish you're craving.

* Car rental agencies at the airport you're flying to that stock thahe brand and model you prefer.

* Movies reviewed positively by people who liked (and disliked) the same movies as you.And those are a few I just thought up while writing this piece. There are thousands more just waiting for a developer -- probably one with an itch that needs scratching -- to step up and write. I'll tell you about them as I hear of them.

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