6 cool new wireless technologies from MIT

MIT grad students show off their research at Wireless Retreat

No strings attached

An impressive array of wireless research was on display at the MIT Wireless Retreat on Monday, which featured everything from sonic networks to real-time photo processing.

RELATED: From the archives: Behind the scenes of MIT’s network

Wireless power transfer
Wireless power transfer

Jouya Jadidian’s adaptable, multi-device system for transmitting power wirelessly made for an eye-catching display. It also gave us a great idea for making Christmas tree lights less of a hassle.

Computational photography
Computational photography

Rahul Rithe explains his computational photography project, which uses a reconfigurable processor to perform advanced multimedia processing in real time. Sort of like an insta-Instagram. (We kid, we kid; it’s obviously much more than that.)

Coded TCP for streaming video
Coded TCP for streaming video

Jason Cloud demonstrates technology designed to speed up wirelessly delivered video performance via modifications to TCP, allowing for congestion control and other improvements. Anything that’ll let us stream House of Cards in full HD when it comes back is fine with us.

802.11p via CMOS+GaN
802.11p via CMOS+GaN

Visiting scholar Pilsoon Choi’s work on device-to-device communication involves the use of short-range wireless protocols and new semiconductor designs, including materials commonly used in advanced military radar sets.

Blurt
Blurt

Peter Iannucci’s sonic network for use in small spaces hissed and whirred, moving data around acoustically. If this sounds familiar, let us point out that Iannucci’s actually doing this over open air, rather than with the benefit of a phone line.

In-software MIMO
In-software MIMO

Swarun Kumar shows off his software-defined MIMO implementation, designed to track and focus Wi-Fi signals on clients while canceling mutual interference. We’re a little weirded out by the idea of the Wi-Fi access point tracking our movements, but Kumar’s results have been impressive.

Email Jon Gold at jgold@nww.com and follow him on Twitter at @NWWJonGold.