A look at 22 Linux Foundation newbies

The wide array of new organizations that have joined the foundation this year.

linux

Come one, come all

Given the open-source community's emphasis on being inclusive and welcoming to as many contributors as possible, it's perhaps unsurprising that the Linux Foundation – an umbrella group working to promote and support the use of Linux – has already added no fewer than 22 new corporate members this year. Here's a look at the companies that joined up.

Axis Communications

Axis Communications

WHO: Swedish network video provider. Makes cameras, encoders and – critically – open-source management software primarily for Internet-based security and surveillance.

WHY: It's not tough to see why a company in Axis' line of would want to learn as much as it possibly could from the bustling Linux community.

D-Link

D-Link

WHO: Taiwanese networking gear manufacturer – routers, adapters, switches, the works. Many readers will no doubt be familiar with the company already.

WHY: “Linux powers a significant segment of today’s networking infrastructure, so it’s a natural step for us to become a member of The Linux Foundation,” global marketing VP Jocelyn Chung said in the January announcement.

O.S. Systems

O.S. Systems

WHO: Brazil-based bespoke business IT firm with a broad range of offerings – everything from hardware prototyping to custom software development. Works heavily with GNU/Linux for the sake of flexibility.

WHY: The company's statement at the time referred to “deepening our relationships,” suggesting that a search for new customers may be on.

Perforce

Perforce

WHO: Business software company. Best known for its revision control system, compatible with Git and its own proprietary (!) format.

WHY: Wants to sell itself as bridging the gap between open-source and enterprise developers.

BORQS

BORQS

WHO: An Android services and software company based in Beijing. Wants to lead the charge toward a commercialization of the platform.

WHY: Three words: Code Aurora Forum. The foundation's collaborative project dedicated to mobile wireless development is a natural fit for BORQS.

Denx

Denx

WHO: Old-school German hardware and software maker, co-founded by longtime Linux contributor Wolfgang Denk. Best-known for the Simple Embedded Linux Framework.

WHY: Linux is pushing advancements in industrial and other embedded software fields, the company says, so it makes sense to ensure they're in on the ground floor.

Gazzang

Gazzang

WHO: Enterprise data security company that makes encryption, diagnostic and monitoring software.

WHY: The biggest enterprise environments are generally running some form of Linux, the company says.

Genymobile

Genymobile

WHO: This French firm makes custom Android distributions and other professional products designed for use with the platform.

WHY: Another Code Aurora Forum enthusiast, Genymobile joined because of the mobile Linux angle.

Mandriva
Softpedia

Mandriva

WHO: More Linux-based business IT, with an eponymous Linux distro to boot. Has drawn some attention recently, thanks to its CloudPulse infrastructure management tool.

WHY: Like the other business-focused companies on the list, Mandriva wants an in with the big enterprise Linux users.

Seneca College

Seneca College

WHO: The Toronto-based technical school boasts extensive programs in business and technology.

WHY: Seneca has a special “Centre” for the Development of Open Technology, so foundation membership is a relatively obvious choice.

Hisense Mobile

Hisense Mobile

WHO: This old – by mobile standards – handset OEM made the first color CDMA phone in China, and still makes a wide variety of associated technology.

WHY: Another Code Aurora Forum participant.

Solarflare

Solarflare

WHO: Solarflare is a network equipment and software vendor that does a lot with management and acceleration technology.

WHY: The company said that it's heavily invested in open-source products in general and Linux in particular, so a stronger commitment to the community makes sense.

Thomas-Krenn

Thomas-Krenn

WHO: The German server manufacturer has recently branched into virtualization software and consulting, but remains primarily a hardware OEM.

WHY: Increased demand for Linux-based products, according to the company.

Bromium

Bromium

WHO: Bromium is best-known for its endpoint security products, and uses several technologies based on Xen, including “micro-virtualization.”

WHY: Essentially, said use of Xen piqued the company's interest in the open-source community.

nexB

nexB

WHO: The primary focus at nexB is helping companies manage open-source software – keeping track of licenses, libraries, and so forth.

WHY: Well, why NOT, really? This is one of those additions where the only real question is “what took you so long?”

ownCloud

ownCloud

WHO: ownCloud makes data management and monitoring systems, designed to make storage more flexible and keep company information on company servers.

WHY: The firm's CEO, Markus Rex, called open-source and Linux “vital” to cloud computing.

AllGo

AllGo

WHO: AllGo is an embedded systems company focusing on video and the automotive industry – those screens in the back of the seats of recent-model minivans, essentially.

WHY: As we've seen, embedded Linux is very much considered a growth area, so it's an understandable decision from AllGo.

Suntec Software

Suntec Software

WHO: Shanghai-based Suntec Software is also a player in the automotive infotainment market, making software for embedded systems.

WHY: The company is looking to bolster its offerings using the collective expertise of the Linux Foundation's membership.

Wargaming

Wargaming

WHO: Wargaming.net runs the highly successful “World of...” series of online multiplayer games, which is probably best-known for the frustratingly addictive World of Tanks.

WHY: Wargaming, no doubt, saw the trend toward Linux support among PC game developers and tried to get out in front of it.

dotCloud
Appsembler

dotCloud

WHO: Essentially, dotCloud is a cloud platform that allows users to turn their web apps into full SaaS deployments.

WHY: The company recently helped create an open-source engine called Docker that is designed to automate the packaging and deployment of applications.

LSI Corporation

LSI Corporation

WHO: LSI is a combined hardware/software company that works to improve data center storage networking.

WHY: The company really likes the foundation's Yocto Project, which is designed to create customized embedded Linux tools through an automated process using templates and tools.

dotCloud

dotCloud
WHO: Essentially, dotCloud is a cloud platform that allows users to turn their web apps into full SaaS deployments.
WHY: The company recently helped create an open-source engine called Docker that is designed to automate the packaging and deployment of applications.