Nobel prize latest in long line for Bell Labs

With the Nobel award for physics being given this week to Willard Boyle and George Smith for the invention and development of the charge-coupled device, Bell Labs has now amassed 13 Nobel prize winners.

Willard Boyle and George Smith are now counted among the elite scientists at Bell Labs with the invention and development of the charge-coupled device. Bell Labs now has had 13 researchers win or share the Nobel prize in physics. Let's take a look back.

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Clinton J. Davisson

In 1937, Clinton J. Davisson won for demonstrating the wave nature of matter. His fundamental work is part of the foundation for much of today's solid-state electronics.

(Source for the information on each winner was derived from Lucent-Alcatel.)

John Bardeen, Walter H. Brattain, and William Shockley

In 1956, John Bardeen, Walter H. Brattain, and William Shockley were honored for inventing the transistor.

Philip W. Anderson

Philip W. Anderson shared a Nobel Prize in 1977 for developing an improved understanding of the electronic structure of glass and magnetic materials.

Arno A. Penzias and Robert W. Wilson

In 1978, Arno A. Penzias and Robert W. Wilson jointly accepted a Nobel Prize for their discovery of background radiation remaining from the "Big Bang" explosion.

Steven Chu

Steven Chu shared a Nobel Prize in 1997 for the development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light.

Horst Störmer, Robert Laughlin, Daniel Tsui

In 1998, Horst Störmer, Robert Laughlin and Daniel Tsui were awarded a Nobel Prize for the discovery and explanation of the fractional quantum Hall effect.

Willard Boyle and George Smith

In 2009 Willard Boyle and George Smith won part of the award for the invention and development of the charge-coupled device.