Top 10 open source apps for Windows, at a glance

Every Windows user should consider making these utilities part of their standard applications

Where Windows and open source get along just fine

Although there is a rivalry between the proprietary Windows and open source communities, there's also a lot of great open source apps for Windows. InfoWorld picks the 10 best. For the full details on each, see our full story.

FileZilla

FileZilla isn't the prettiest Windows application. However, it gets the job done, providing a wealth of options to streamline and automate batch transfers.

VirtualBox

Watch out, VMware! VirtualBox 3.0 now supports up to 32 virtual CPUs per guest OS session, making it the new class leader in desktop virtualization scalability.

OpenOffice.org

OpenOffice.org is the quintessential free open source application, with numerous derivative works -- like the Novell-driven Go-OO.org variant -- providing an endless variety of custom-tailored solutions.

Firefox

Firefox is another standard bearer for the free open source movement, with features that surpass even those of commercially developed Web browsers.

Paint.Net

Although Paint.Net may not be ready to take on the best-of-breed commercial offerings, it still provides more than enough muscle to satisfy all but the most demanding artists.

Media Player Classic

Don't let Media Player Classic's unassuming looks fool you. This is not your father's media player, as evidenced by the wealth of internally supported media formats.

TrueCrypt

Cross over to the dark side of digital paranoia with TrueCrypt’s hidden volume option -- 007, eat your heart out!

PDFCreator

Forget Adobe Acrobat. With PDFCreator you can generate PDFs on the fly, with a wide range of security and digital authoring components.

7-Zip

7-Zip's LZMA-based algorithms deliver excellent compression ratios -- for example, deflating a megabyte of files to a package of just 64KB in size.

ClamWin

ClamWin is a tweaker's paradise, with a plethora of configuration and tuning parameters to satisfy the savviest user.

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