iPhone 6s Force Touch feature will boost usability

iPhone 6s Force Touch
Credit: Thinkstock

As opposed to past years, it remains to be seen what the key selling point of Apple's next-gen iPhone will be. Even going back just a few generations, killer features and incentives to upgrade were obvious: the iPhone 4s had Siri, the iPhone 5 had a bigger display, the 5s had Touch ID, and the iPhone 6 came with gargantuan displays.

With the iPhone 6s launch just about a month away, the product isn't exactly shrouded in mystery, yet a killer feature remains somewhat elusive. If forced to pick, it seems that Force Touch -- the same technology Apple first introduced on the Apple Watch -- may be positioned as the iPhone 6s' most alluring feature. That being the case, just how Apple plans to implement Force Touch on its next-gen iPhone remain open to speculation.

Fleshing things out a bit, 9to5Mac earlier this week published a report relaying some intriguing details surrounding Apple's plans for Force Touch. As many previously assumed, Force Touch on the iPhone will go a long ways towards creating an even more intuitive user experience.

The report reads in part:

New to the Force Touch experience, a user can look up a point of interest in the Maps application, and then Force Touch on the destination to immediately begin turn-by-turn directions. 

...
Another feature in testing, according to one source, are shortcuts that appear after Force Touching an app icon on the Home screen. For example, if a user deep presses on the Phone app icon, he could choose to shortcut directly to the Voicemail tab. This could also apply to deep pressing the News app icon and being taken directly to either the Favorites or For You tabs.

To help alert users that they have activated Force Touch, the report adds that when iOS detects a hard press, there will be some degree of haptic feedback.

Highlighting the user interface potential an iPhone with Force Touch brings to the table, the following concept video showcases how such a feature would make tinkering with a device's system settings much more intuitive.

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