Andrew Sullivan

Opinions expressed by ICN authors are their own.

A fellow at Dyn, Andrew Sullivan has worked in the tech industry since 2001, when he was part of the group that launched the new top-level domain (TLD) information. He has been active in the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) for about a decade and previously served as co-chair of the DNS Extensions working group and SPF Updates working group. He was appointed to the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) in 2013 and named chair in 2015. An activity of the IETF, the IAB offers a broad view of the overall Internet architecture and also functions as the IETF’s interface to external parties.

At Dyn, Andrew began as the company’s director of labs, charged with getting the Labs up and running to work on next-generation Dyn technologies and leading the company's efforts in Internet standards and policy development. After that, he became Dyn’s director of DNS engineering, leading the team responsible for improving Dyn's DNS service offerings. Following that, he was named the company’s principal architect, charged with designing and reviewing proposals for Dyn’s hardware and software systems with expert knowledge on Internet protocols and policy. He later became Dyn’s director of architecture, managing and directing the Dyn architecture and labs groups and reporting directly to the CTO. In that position, he designed and reviewed proposals for all of Dyn’s technical systems. In March of 2015, when he became IAB chair, he was named a Dyn fellow, concentrating on the architecture of Internet systems. On a daily basis, Andrew works on Internet standards, protocols and policy. He also serves as a guide for the company’s technical staff when questions arise.

Andrew holds a bachelor's degree from the University of Ottawa and a master's degree from McMaster University, both in philosophy.

The opinions expressed in this blog are those of Andrew Sullivan and do not necessarily represent those of IDG Communications Inc., or its parent, subsidiary or affiliated companies.

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