Fahmida Y. Rashid

Senior Writer

Fahmida Y. Rashid is a senior writer at InfoWorld, focused on the information security beat. Before joining InfoWorld, she wrote about networking and security for various technology publications, including eWeek, PC Magazine, Dark Reading, and CRN. She also spent years as an IT administrator, software developer, and data analyst. "I, for one, welcome our new computer overlords."

McAfee: Wave of Shamoon cyberattacks being coordinated by a single group

Don't get bit by zombie cloud data

Don't get bit by zombie cloud data

Data you thought you had deleted from the cloud can come back to haunt you. Get to know your provider’s data deletion policy

Shadow Brokers dump contained Solaris hacking tools

Shadow Brokers dump contained Solaris hacking tools

The tools would let attackers remotely take over any Solaris system around the world

Trust issues: Know the limits of SSL certificates

Trust issues: Know the limits of SSL certificates

All SSL certs are not created equal, and web browsers make matters worse by not clearly showing what security you’re actually getting

Old attack code is new weapon for Russian hackers

Old attack code is new weapon for Russian hackers

Researchers found commonalities between tools used against Solaris 20 years ago and modern-day attacks deployed against Windows PCs

Google tries to beat AWS at cloud security

Google tries to beat AWS at cloud security

New tools that protect enterprise applications running on Google Cloud Platform may help take the spotlight away from AWS and Microsoft Azure

How to scrub your private data from 'people finder' sites

How to scrub your private data from 'people finder' sites

The internet has your number—among many other deets. Prevent identity theft and doxxing by erasing yourself from aggregator sites like Spokeo and PeekYou

5 open source security tools too good to ignore

5 open source security tools too good to ignore

Look to these clever open source tools to keep secrets out of source code, identify malicious files, block malicious processes, and keep endpoints safe

Why 2017 will be the worst year ever for security

Why 2017 will be the worst year ever for security

High-profile breaches are just the tip of the iceberg. Many have never been detected or disclosed--and without a major infrastructure changes it's only going to get worse

Self-protection is key to Linux kernel security

Self-protection is key to Linux kernel security

Finding and fixing Linux security vulnerabilities amounts to the usual whack-a-mole. The real solution is to harden the Linux kernel and let it protect itself

5 signs we're finally getting our act together on security

5 signs we're finally getting our act together on security

Despite all the bad news in information security in 2016, some positive developments may finally shift momentum

Encryption in 2016: Small victories add up

Encryption in 2016: Small victories add up

The move from SHA-1 to SHA-2, a Congressional victory over backdoors, and the rise of encrypted communications are leading us toward a more secure world

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