Marvin Waschke

Opinions expressed by ICN authors are their own.

Marvin Waschke was a senior principal software architect at CA Technologies. His career has spanned the mainframe to the cloud. He has coded, designed and managed the development of many systems, ranging through accounting, cell tower management, enterprise service desks, configuration management and network management. Since 2013, he has pursued an independent career as a writer of books on computing, especially enterprise cloud computing.

Waschke represented CA Technologies on the DMTF Cloud Management Working Group, DMTF Open Virtualization Format Working Group, DMTF Common Information Model REST Interface Working Group, OASIS Topology and Orchestration Specification for Cloud Applications (TOSCA) Technical Committee, DMTF Cloud Auditing Data Federation Working Group (observer), DMTF Configuration Database Federation Working Group, W3C Service Modeling Language Working Group, and OASIS OData Technical Committee (observer). On his retirement from CA, he was honored as a DMTF Fellow for his distinguished past and continuing significant contributions to the DMTF and continues his work with the DMTF on cloud standards.

Waschke was the editor-in-chief of the CA Technology Exchange, an online technical journal. He is the author of Cloud Standards: Agreements That Hold Together Clouds and How Clouds Hold IT Together: Integrating Architecture with Cloud Deployment. His latest book is Personal Cybersecurity: How to Avoid and Recover from Cybercrime. All his books have been published by Apress.

Waschke is also chairman of the Board of Trustees of Whatcom County Library System and is vitally interested in the evolution of digital libraries.

The opinions expressed in this blog are those of Marvin Waschke and do not necessarily represent those of IDG Communications, Inc., its parent, subsidiary or affiliated companies.

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