Search /
Docfinder:
Advanced search  |  Help  |  Site map
RESEARCH CENTERS
SITE RESOURCES
Click for Layer 8! No, really, click NOW!
Networking for Small Business
TODAY'S NEWS
While Heartbleed distracts, hackers hit US universities
How Apple's billion dollar sapphire bet will pay off
US to vote on sharp increase in broadband subsidies
iPhone 6 rumor rollup for the week ending April 18
NSA spying revelations have tired out China's Huawei
Arista co-founder may have switch maker by its jewels
Apple kicks off public OS X beta testing
Open source pitfalls – and how to avoid them
AT&T's expanded 1 Gbps fiber rollout could go head to head with Google
BlackBerry Releases BES 10 Security Update to Address 'Heartbleed' Flaw
Verizon: Web apps are the security punching bag of the Internet
Cisco announces security service linked with new operations centers
Dell launches virtual storage accelerator, aims to boost SAN performance
Free OS X Mavericks now powers half of all Macs
Even the most secure cloud storage may not be so secure, study finds  
3D printing will transform these five industries
Most but not all sites have fixed Heartbleed flaw
NEC launches face-recognition protection for PCs
Hundreds of medical professionals targeted in multi-state tax scam
Super-high frequencies could one day deliver your mobile video
Americans cool with lab-grown organs, but not designer babies
IT Departments Not Losing Ground to Managed Service Providers (Yet)
Where's my gigabit Internet, anyway?
IE6: Retired but not dead yet
Enterprise who? Google says little about Apps, business cloud services in Q1 report
/

Microsoft delays release of Windows.Net Server

Related linksToday's breaking news
Send to a friendFeedback


Microsoft confirmed Friday that it is pushing back the release date of Windows.Net Server by six months.

The software, which is the next version of Windows 2000 server, was supposed to ship in the first half of this year but is now slated to ship in the second half. Microsoft says a "release candidate," which is a final beta test before product shipment, will happen this summer.

On the whole, the delay is not really bad news for IT executives. "Now they have one less thing to worry about," says John Enck, an analyst with Gartner. But Enck says there are two classes of users that may feel some pinch.

"There are the guys on NT that skipped Windows 2000. This delay now makes it more dangerous as they look at the 2004 drop-dead date for the end of NT support. And the guys who are already running Windows 2000 and waiting for the improvements to Active Directory now have to wait longer."

The big issue for Microsoft itself is that the delay of Windows.Net Server means the late arrival of the first server to natively include the .Net Framework, the runtime environment for Web-based distributed applications built using Visual Studio.Net. The .Net Framework, however, was released last month along with Visual Studio.Net and can be installed on Windows 2000.

The .Net Framework is a critical foundation technology for Microsoft's .Net strategy to deliver software over the Internet as a set of components. The Windows.Net Server delay is due in part to a directive issued in January by Bill Gates, Microsoft's chief security architecture, that product development will focus more on security, privacy and availability, or what he called "trustworthy computing". Microsoft has delayed the start of any new development projects as it focuses on shoring up security in its current development efforts, including instructing its engineers on the latest secure coding techniques.

Microsoft did not rule out the possibility that the impact of that effort may further delay Windows.Net Server. In a statement about the delay, the company said "there will continue to be modifications and additions to engineering processes and procedures that may lengthen the delivery schedule in the short term but will yield higher quality and customer approval in the long term."

IT executives can only hope. Last month alone, Microsoft posted 12 security bulletins patching various problems in its software from Internet Explorer to SQL Server. Security is a major issue as Microsoft embarks on its .Net strategy, which assumes a secure distributed computing environment. Over the years, however, Microsoft products have been hit repeatedly by security breaches and malicious code.

RELATED LINKS

Contact Senior Editor John Fontana

Other recent articles by Fontana


NWFusion offers more than 40 FREE technology-specific email newsletters in key network technology areas such as NSM, VPNs, Convergence, Security and more.
Click here to sign up!
New Event - WANs: Optimizing Your Network Now.
Hear from the experts about the innovations that are already starting to shake up the WAN world. Free Network World Technology Tour and Expo in Dallas, San Francisco, Washington DC, and New York.
Attend FREE
Your FREE Network World subscription will also include breaking news and information on wireless, storage, infrastructure, carriers and SPs, enterprise applications, videoconferencing, plus product reviews, technology insiders, management surveys and technology updates - GET IT NOW.