Network World
Saturday, April 19, 2014
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Error 404--Not Found

Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.

Seven ways to boost application performance

Network managers and industry experts share some tips, tricks and technologies that help amp up apps.

When it comes to boosting application performance, it's about a lot more than just the bandwidth.

Related links
Error 404--Not Found

Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.

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An analysis of satellite communication gear from more than a half-dozen major manufacturers has uncovered critical vulnerabilities that could be exploited to disrupt military operations and ship and aircraft communications.

"Our network is scattered across the country with 82 field offices and 10 regional locations. Our field offices don't have local servers, and they had pretty slow lines," says Chris Finucane, CTO for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General in Washington, D.C. "We optimized the network and upgraded all our links to T-1 lines, and the field offices didn't notice a huge difference. That's when we realized bandwidth can't be everything and we needed to investigate other means to improve application performance."

Finucane's challenge is not unique, according to industry watchers who say today's increasingly complex applications simply aren't designed to run smoothly across large distributed networks that support branch, remote and mobile workers. That has network executives scrambling to invest in new technologies - such as application acceleration and WAN optimization tools - and others working with system administrators and application developers to tweak internal servers and fine-tune application code. We spoke with a handful of network professionals and industry analysts to get their advice on how to boost application performance across a network.

1. Emulate WAN conditions.

Sometimes the best defense is a good offense. That's the premise behind products that simulate network - specifically WAN - conditions to help network managers (and application developers) get a handle on how an application will behave on a given network under certain conditions.


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