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Error 404--Not Found

Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.

Linux community getting its second wind

Open source software consortium promotes developer unity, better licensing

Linux is entering its second phase of growth, which will be defined by better cooperation among developers, new licensing options, and a stronger operating system, according to the leaders of the nonprofit Linux Foundation.

The invitees were asked to begin hammering out how to refine development of the open source operating system, from device drivers to mobile support, and to define standards for building applications that can easily run across Linux distributions.

The group also took on the soon-to-be published GNU General Public License (GPL) 3.0, an important evolution of Linux’s open source licensing model. Despite the recent hype around GPLv3, especially concerning cross-licensing patent deals involving Microsoft and various Linux vendors, the new license was characterized as another option on a long list of open source licenses.

Click to see:

Linux work order
The Linux Foundation, formed earlier this year by a merger of the Open Source Development Labs and the Free Standards Group, held its first summit last week, calling on its members to usher Linux into the second phase of its development cycle. Here are the foundationÕs big-picture rallying cries
 
Focus
Details
Core development

Device drivers are a major issue. Tweaks to kernel development processes.
Driving business use of Linux

Adoption across industry verticals, with Google and IBM as examples.
Mobile Linux
Develop hooks that drive open source into all kinds of devices.
Linux Standard Base
Program to build interoperability between applications and the Linux operating system.
Collaboration among community members
Work to integrate development tools and identity systems to expand community participation, interaction.
Legal and licensing issues
Defend Linux from competitive attacks; education around licensing options, ramifications.

“Everybody just chill when v3 comes out,” said Dan Frye, vice president of Linux and open technology at IBM and of its Linux Technology Center. “It is going to happen, it has been a long process, we will work with some of the communities that adopt it and we will see how things go,” he said to applause during a panel session.

Linux’s “tremendous opportunity”

The summit opened, however, with the message that Linux is entering a period of development that will result in it becoming even more competitive.

“We have a tremendous opportunity with Linux,” said Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation. “We want it to be wildly successful.”

To achieve that goal, he said, the foundation will protect Linux from attacks by competitors, nurture developers and untangle legal issues.

“From an end user perspective, what you will get out of this is much better software in a much shorter time. That is what we are doing here,” he said.

During a series of panels, kernel developers, users and lawyers discussed some of the pressing open source issues.

User companies such as Motorola called for better support of mobile features that could make embedded Linux a preferred device platform for hosting applications.

“If you look at the next generation of the mobile market it is all about the [software],” said Christy Wyatt, vice president of Motorola. “Can I support mobile messaging, multimedia? The voice call is a commodity and [the question] becomes what are the other things I can charge for?”

Motorola’s plans call for Linux to comprise about 60% of its mobile portfolio in the near future, according to Wyatt. The company already ships about 6,000 devices that include Linux. “In the mobile space it is about broadening our opportunity.”

Ubuntu Linux founder Mark Shuttleworth said the open source community has to become even more efficient in working together and drop squabbles that hinder progress.

“Collaboration is more important than our differences,” he said.

Shuttleworth said different iterations of similar tools, such as bug-tracking software, should be able to programmatically talk to one another as a way to eliminate redundant work efforts, and capabilities, such as distributed revision control, are keys to streamlining the development process. He also called for standards to foster integration.

Linux application certification

The foundation also tackled the idea of certifying applications to Linux and pointed to how to jump-start its Linux Standard Base (LSB), which ensures applications can be written once and run on many Linux distributions. All major distributions comply with the LSB, but the issue is that certified applications number only in the hundreds.

Brian Aker, director of architecture for MySQL, suggested that certification efforts should focus on newly developed applications and not porting older applications to Linux.

“MySQL works when new development gets done,” said Aker. “When new applications are built on Linux that is how we win.”

Legal experts also tackled burning issues over licensing and recent patent claims made by Microsoft.

“Companies using Linux don’t have to fear patent suits,” said Mark Radcliffe, a partner at DLA Piper US who advises companies on intellectual property issues. “I think the Microsoft strategy went awry. I think it is irrelevant if you want to use Linux.”

Legal experts also debated the comparison of open source and open standards and said the world is talking about open standards not different Linux distributions.

“We need to accept Linux for what it is, software,” said Jason Wacha, vice president of corporate affairs and general counsel for MontaVista Software. “Let’s now figure out a way to standardize, use this thing, make it better and build stuff on top of it.”

The foundation’s Zemlin said everything adds up to the fact that the world now understands Linux. “Nobody needs to explain anymore why open source is good. It’s a multibillion dollar industry and everyone understands that.”

Open standards and Linux distros By Anonymous on June 16, 2007, 2:43 pm Reply | Read entire comment "Legal experts also debated the comparison of open source and open standards and said the world is talking about open standards, not different Linux distributions." Yes,...

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