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One less reason to adopt IPv6?

Cisco, Microsoft promote DHCPv6 instead of autoconfiguration

By , Network World
September 14, 2007 01:11 PM ET

Network World - For a decade, IPv6 proponents have pushed this upgrade to the Internet’s main communications protocol because of its three primary benefits: a gargantuan address space, end-to-end security, and easier network administration through automatic device configuration.

Now it turns out that one of these IPv6 benefits — autoconfiguration — may not be such a boon for corporate network managers. A growing number of IPv6 experts say that corporations probably will skip autoconfiguration and instead stick with DHCP, which has been updated to support IPv6.

Autoconfiguration vs. DHCPv6 has become a point of contention among IPv6 proponents. As recently as last month, the IETF — the standards body that created IPv6 and DHCPv6 — held a lively online debate about rethinking autoconfiguration in light of DHCPv6.

“This is a widely discussed issue. Which is better: DHCPv6 or autoconfiguration?” says Timothy Winters, software engineering manager at the University of New Hampshire’s Inter Operability Lab. The UNH-IOL operates Moonv6, the world’s largest IPv6 test bed.

DHCPv6 products emerging
The following companies have participated in Moonv6's DHCPv6 testing with beta or commercial products:

Alcatel-Lucent
Alaxala Networks
Cisco
HP
IBM
Juniper Networks
Konica Minolta
Microsoft
Symantec
      SOURCE: UNH-IOL
Click to see: Companies that have participated in Moonv6's DHCPv6 testing

Winters sees the commercial software industry starting to back DHCPv6 because of the additional controls and tracking and debugging features it provides. “Moonv6 tried to run DHCPv6 testing two and a half years ago, and we only had two or three companies that did servers and software,” he says. “A year later, we had 14 companies…We’ve definitely seen the DHCPv6 implementations explode.”

The biggest backer of DHCPv6 is Cisco, which has supported DHCPv6 in its IOS since 2003, and also supports it in Cisco Network Register (CNR). The company says the next version of CNR, expected out by early 2008, will feature parity between DHCPv4 and DHCPv6. “From a security standpoint and for information assurance, network managers all still want visibility into their networks,” says Dave West, director of field operations for Cisco’s Federal Center of Excellence. “We believe the demand is going to be there for DHCPv6.”

Microsoft is starting to support DHCPv6, too. Microsoft Vista’s IPv6 implementation supports DHCPv6, although its earlier IPv6 support in Windows XP did not. Microsoft says Windows Server 2008 will support DHCPv6 as well.

BlueCat Networks began offering limited support for DHCPv6 in its Proteus and Adonis appliances in 2007. “We have not seen a tremendous amount of demand for DHCPv6,” says Cricket Liu, vice president of architecture at Infoblox. “We don’t see a ton of companies champing at the bit to implement IPv6. And where they will be prodded to because [the American Registry for Internet Numbers] starts issuing only IPv6 addresses, they’ll use IPv6 externally and they’ll still use network address translation internally. So we don’t see an opportunity for DHCPv6.”

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