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Microsoft begins paving path for IT, cloud integration

Technologies revealed that support bridges between networks

By , Network World
November 23, 2009 01:13 PM ET

Network World - LOS ANGELES -- Microsoft last week launched its first serious effort to build IT into its cloud plans by introducing technologies that help connect existing corporate networks and cloud services to make them look like a single infrastructure.

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The concept began to come together at Microsoft's Professional Developers Conference. The company is attempting to show that it wants to move beyond the first wave of the cloud trend, which is defined by the availability of raw computing power supplied by Microsoft and competitors such as Amazon and Google. Microsoft's goal is to supply tools, middleware and services so users can run applications that span corporate and cloud networks, especially those built with Microsoft's Azure cloud operating system

"Azure is looking at the second wave," says Ray Valdes, an analyst with Gartner. "That wave is what happens after raw infrastructure. When companies start moving real systems to the cloud and those systems are hybrid and they have to connect back in significant ways to legacy environments. It's a big challenge and a big opportunity for Microsoft."

To attack the opportunity, Microsoft introduced projects called Sydney, AppFabric, Next Generation Active Directory, System Center "Cloud", and updates to the .Net Framework that provide bridges between corporate networks and cloud services. While a small portion of the software is available now, the majority will hit beta cycles in 2010.

The message Microsoft pushed to IT developers and infrastructure architects was that its software-plus-services strategy recognizes corporate needs. The pressing questions, however, will center on just what kind of effort it takes to deploy, manage and maintain applications across domains.

"We are testing Azure and how it integrates with our corporate network, but we are in the very early stages and we have questions. We'll look at and test some of these tools when they are available," said one IT architect from a financial services firm who ask that he not be identified.

Microsoft says it has heard IT's feedback since it introduced Azure at last year's PDC and it is aware of corporate constraints and concerns.

"Everybody is not going to move everything they have running in IT to the cloud. People have data sets, they have privacy issues, competitive issues and for whatever reason people will keep things in the data center," said Amitabh Srivastava, the senior vice president at Microsoft responsible for Windows Azure. In 2006, Srivastava and Dave Cutler started Microsoft's cloud operating system project under the code name Red Dog, which became Azure. "A lot of apps are going to be split between cloud and IT and you want to have bridging technologies so we are going to provide services, tools or various ways to partition your applications in any way you want," Srivastava added.

To do that they will need tools such as Project Sydney, which was introduced as a concept at PDC. Sydney creates a sort of virtual network that ties together pieces of an application or processes running in various places so they all looks like one logical system.

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