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First malware discovered that targets Android

The malware is believed to be the first to target the Android mobile operating system

By Jeremy Kirk, IDG News Service
August 11, 2010 05:41 AM ET

IDG News Service - Researchers at Russian security company Kaspersky Lab say they've discovered the first malicious software program to target Google's Android mobile operating system.

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The application masquerades as a media player, according to a Kaspersky blog post. But if it is installed, the rogue application begins secretly sending SMSs (Short Message Service) to a premium rate number presumably belonging to the hackers who created it.

There have been isolated cases of spyware programs that run on the Android platform, an open-source mobile operating system created by Google. But the fake media player application, which Kaspersky dubbed "Trojan-SMS.AndroidOS.FakePlayer.a," is the first one believed to specifically target Android, Kaspersky said.

"Kaspersky Lab recommends that users pay close attention to the services that an application requests access to when it is being installed," the company said. "That includes access to premium rate services that charge to send SMSes and make calls."

The application is simply called "Movie Player," according to Lookout, a company that makes mobile phone security and management software. The malware does apparently warn users they may be charged for SMSs if they install it. The SMSs costs "several dollars," Lookout's blog said.

Lookout suggested that Android users check the permissions of the media player applications and revoke any that mention charging for SMSs. The malware may not spread far, however, for a couple of reasons.

"So far this has only affected Android smartphone users in Russia and only works on Russian networks," Lookout said. "As far as we know, there is no indication that this app is in the Android Market."

Google said in a statement that users see a screen after downloading an application that explains what information and system resources that application can access, such as their phone number or the SMS function.

"Users must explicitly approve this access in order to continue with the installation, and they may uninstall applications at any time," Google said. "We consistently advise users to only install apps they trust. In particular, users should exercise caution when installing applications outside of Android Market."

As another defense against this malware, users can set their phone to only download applications that are in the Android Market

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