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10,000-core Linux supercomputer built in Amazon cloud

Cycle Computing builds cloud-based supercomputing cluster to boost scientific research.

By , Network World
April 06, 2011 03:15 PM ET

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The cluster used a Gigabit Ethernet interconnect, because the workload did not require a faster interconnect.

To provision the cluster, Cycle used its own CycleCloud software, the Condor scheduling system and Chef, an open source configuration management framework.

Cycle also used some of its own software to detect errors and restart nodes when necessary, a shared file system, and a few extra nodes on top of the 10,000 to handle some of the legwork. To ensure security, the cluster was engineered with secure-HTTP and 128/256-bit Advanced Encryption Standard encryption, according to Cycle.

Cycle Computing boasted that the cluster was roughly equivalent to the 114th fastest supercomputer in the world on the Top 500 list, which hit about 66 teraflops. In reality, they didn't run the speed benchmark required to submit a cluster to the Top 500 list, but nearly all of the systems listed below No. 114 in the ranking contain fewer than 10,000 cores.

Genentech is still waiting to see whether the simulations lead to anything useful in the real world, but Corn says the data "looks fantastic." He says Genentech is "very open" to building out more Amazon clusters, and Cycle Computing is looking ahead as well.

"We're already working on scaling up larger," Stowe says. All Cycle needs is a customer with "a use case to take advantage of it."

Follow Jon Brodkin on Twitter: www.twitter.com/jbrodkin

Read more about cloud computing in Network World's Cloud Computing section.

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