Skip Links

Microsoft alum: Windows 8 "a much deadlier assault weapon" than Windows 7

Former Microsoft senior VP says Windows 8 on ARM tablets is a "scale 9 earthquake"

By , Network World
January 23, 2013 04:39 PM ET
Joachim Kempin
Joachim Kempin

Network World - Windows 8 is just what Microsoft needs to take advantage of the ongoing irreversible shift from PCs to handheld devices including iPads, iPhones and other form factors yet to be designed, according to the company's former OEM chief.

Just as Windows 7 won instant popularity after the debacle of Vista, Windows 8 is poised to capture business from phone and tablet leaders such as Apple, only to greater effect, says Joachim Kempin, former Microsoft senior vice president in charge of OEMs who worked for the company from 1983 to 2002.

"Windows 7 spearheaded a comparably small rejuvenation," Kempin says in his just-released book "Resolve and Fortitude: Microsoft's Secret Power Broker Breaks his Silence". "I predict Windows 8 is readied as a much deadlier assault weapon."

[TEST YOURSELF: The Windows 8 quiz 

NAVIGATE: 12 essential Windows 8 keyboard shortcuts 

CLOUD: Microsoft target virtualization with Windows 8/Server combo 

HELP: 11 (FREE!) Microsoft tools to make life easier

He says the main intent of Windows 8 is to push the operating system into low-powered mobile devices running ARM processors vs traditional x86 chips. He says that when Microsoft introduced Windows 8 nearly two years ago it "flabbergasted the IT world by running on a tablet powered by NVidia's ARM-based CPU. I consider this move to ARM a scale 9 earthquake and wake-up call for MS's longtime allies Intel and AMD."

He says that shift potentially signals the end of notebooks and PCs, not just media tablets. A strength of Windows 8 is its common interface and navigation across all devices, he says.

"No need to bother with the annoyance of having to remember different key strokes or gestures when switching between devices or operating them with a mouse or a touch screen," Kempin says. "Neither Apple nor Google have ever accomplished such uniformity."

He praises the design of Microsoft's two Surface tablet models but dooms them to failure.

He thinks they will anger OEMs that were working on their own Windows 8 tablets and notebooks and who now may be driven to make them with Linux or Google operating systems.

In addition, he doubts the devices themselves can be profitable. "MS does not own a factory and has a track record of having trouble with sourcing hardware components and producing devices as cheaply as her competitors," he says. "I do not know who did the math on this project. The slim revenue gain with not much hope for real profits combined with losing partners' trust and loyalties seems not worth that risk."

Instead, Microsoft should spin off a startup with the mission of making Windows 8 devices, putting a distance between the devices and Microsoft itself and creating just another OEM that competes with current OEMs.

Still, he likes Surface RT. "Adding an innovative wireless keyboard makes it a hybrid located between today's notebooks and tablets," he says. "When combined with the slick design promises to totally obsolete notebooks in a few years when solid state drives will become cheap and small enough to replace traditional hard drive storage units."

Our Commenting Policies
Latest News
rssRss Feed
View more Latest News