Skip Links

Study finds zero-day vulnerabilities abound in popular software

By Antone Gonsalves, CSO
December 06, 2013 09:37 AM ET

CSO - Subscribers to organizations that sell exploits for vulnerabilities not yet known to software developers gain daily access to scores of flaws in the world's most popular technology, a study shows.

[ALSO: 15 free security tools you should try]

[Nation-state likely behind attack on IE zero-day flaw]

NSS Labs, which is in the business of testing security products for corporate subscribers, found that over the last three years, subscribers of two major vulnerability programs had access on any given day to at least 58 exploitable flaws in Microsoft, Apple, Oracle or Adobe products.

In addition, NSS labs found that an average of 151 days passed from the time when the programs purchased a vulnerability from a researcher and the affected vendor released a patch.

The findings, released Thursday, were based on an analysis of 10 years of data from TippingPoint, a network security maker Hewlett-Packard acquired in 2010, and iDefense, a security intelligence service owned by VeriSign. Both organizations buy vulnerabilities, inform subscribers and work with vendors in producing patches.

Stefan Frei, NSS research director and author of the report, said the actual number of secret vulnerabilities available to cybercriminals, government agencies and corporations is much larger, because of the amount of money they are willing to pay.

Cybercriminals will buy so-called zero-day vulnerabilities in the black market, while government agencies and corporations purchase them from brokers and exploit clearinghouses, such as VUPEN Security, ReVuln, Endgame Systems, Exodus Intelligence and Netragard.

The six vendors collectively can provide at least 100 exploits per year to subscribers, Frei said. According to a February 2010 price list, Endgame sold 25 zero-day exploits a year for $2.5 million.

In July, Netragard founder Adriel Desautels told The New York Times that the average vulnerability sells from around $35,000 to $160,000.

Part of the reason vulnerabilities are always present is because of developer errors and also because software makers are in the business of selling product, experts say. The latter means meeting deadlines for shipping software often trumps spending additional time and money on security.

Because of the number of vulnerabilities bought and sold, companies that believe their intellectual property makes them prime targets for well-financed hackers should assume their computer systems have already been breached, Frei said.

"One hundred percent prevention is not possible," he said.

Therefore, companies need to have the experts and security tools in place to detect compromises, Frei said. Once a breach is discovered, then there should be a well-defined plan in place for dealing with it.

[WHMCS Zero-Day vulnerability used against PureVPN]

That plan should include gathering forensic evidence to determine how the breach occurred. In addition, all software on the infected systems should be removed and reinstalled.

Steps taken following a breach should be reviewed regularly to make sure they are up to date.

Our Commenting Policies
Latest News
rssRss Feed
View more Latest News