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Banks push for tokenization standard to secure credit card payments

Tokenization addresses gaps in EMV smartcard standard, says indsutry group

By Jaikumar Vijayan, Computerworld
February 12, 2014 03:21 PM ET

Computerworld - A group representing 22 of the world's largest banks is pushing for broad adoption in the U.S. of payment card technology called tokenization, citing shortcomings in the planned migration to the Europay MasterCard Visa (EMV) smartcard standard over the next two years.

The Clearing House Payments Company (TCH), whose owners include Bank of America, Citibank, Capital One and JP Morgan Chase, is working with member banks to see how tokenization can be applied to online and mobile payment environments to protect against fraud.

The effort stems from what the group says is the need to address gaps in the EMV standard involving mobile and online transactions.

"EMV has been out there for close to 20 years" and has served its purpose well, said Dave Fortney, senior vice president, product development and management for The Clearing House.

Debit and credit cards based on the EMV technology use an embedded microchip, instead of a magnetic stripe, to store data and are considered almost impossible to clone for fraudulent purposes. Though the rest of the world moved to the technology years ago, the U.S. has lagged behind for a variety of reasons.

However, after the recent Target breach that exposed data on 40 million debit and credit cards, calls to adopt the standard in the U.S. have become more strident. MasterCard and Visa have said they want merchants and banks to be ready to start accepting EMV cards by October 2015.

While the planned migration has its benefits, EMV is not quite the panacea that many assume it is, Fortney said. "The downside with EMV is that it was created when there was no Internet, no online commerce, no smartphones and no tablets."

While EMV is great for securing card transactions at point-of-sale terminals, it is less useful for online payments and other card-not-present transactions. That is one of the major reasons why payment card fraud has migrated from point-of-sale systems to online channels in Europe and other places that have already adopted EMV.

Payment card tokenization is one way to address this gap, Fortney noted.

Tokenization is a method for protecting card data by substituting a card's Primary Account Number (PAN) with a unique, randomly generated sequence of numbers, alphanumeric characters, or a combination of a truncated PAN and a random alphanumeric sequence.

The token is usually the same length and format as the original PAN, so it appears no different than a standard payment card number to back-end transaction processing systems, applications and storage.

The random sequence, or "token," acts as a substitute value for the actual PAN while a transaction is processed or while the data is at rest inside a retailer's systems. The token can be reversed to its true associated PAN value at any time with the right decryption keys. Tokens can be either single use tokens or multi-use tokens.

Tokenization eliminates the need for merchants, e-commerce sites and operators of mobile wallets to store sensitive payment card data on their networks, said Fortney.

Originally published on www.computerworld.com. Click here to read the original story.

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