Error 404--Not Found

Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.

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Error 404--Not Found

Error 404--Not Found

From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:

10.4.5 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent.

If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 403 (Forbidden) can be used instead. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address.







The power prognosticator

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Watch out for Active Directory

By John Fontana

The new year may be a good time to get out the survival gear, because the network operating system landscape in 2000 is likely to be littered with more dead and wounded than a special edition of a Marvel comic book.

What will so terrorize enterprise networks? It certainly won't be the lingering effects of the Year 2000 bug. It won't be NetWare, Solaris, Linux or any other Unix mutants.

Rather, the culprit will be Microsoft's Windows 2000, and for one obvious reason: Active Directory. This is not a slam against the directory technology, which has undergone a more rigorous beta-testing period than any product Microsoft has ever released. No, this is a comment on Active Directory's innate complexity. Active Directory leaves no room for error. Mess up on this technology, and you'll soon be watching the rest of your Windows 2000 deployment implode. Active Directory could truly prove to be kryptonite for the Supermen and Superwomen in your IT groups.

Just ask any Novell Directory Services (NDS) administrator about the challenges of rolling out an enterprise directory. Six years ago, these administrators struggled mightily when Novell first released its directory. Sure, Microsoft has probably learned a few things from watching Novell, but heaven help those who underestimate the effort it takes to deploy an enterprise directory. The only saving grace may be that while few NDS administrators enjoyed the ride, they love the destination.

Most analysts predict Win 2000 rollouts will begin to happen in earnest near the end of 2000. Enterprises will experiment in their labs and run pilots starting in February, when the software is released. Those tests will last from six to 10 months, then companies will take the plunge and start to exorcise existing NT networks.

But look for Active Directory to extend many pilots.

Even the first step of moving toward Active Directory, deciding to organize the directory along geographical or organizational lines, will be loaded with peril. The decision process will include enough politics to end a few careers. Things will get even tougher once you start dealing with forests, trees, organizational units and schemas.

Microsoft has already sent out an advisory warning customers and prospects that Active Directory deserves IT's undivided attention. The company has issued white papers, forged relationships with third-party developers and acquired technologies all designed to make the job of installing Active Directory and Win 2000 easier.

That being said, all you enterprise superheroes better be ready for a good fight.

Related links

Contact Senior Editor John Fontana

Other recent articles by Fontana

Wares Extraordinare: Active Directory
Mark Gibbs on how Active Directory will be a winner. Network World, 11/15/99.

Forum: Active Directory users could learn from NDS
Discuss the two directories with other Fusion users.

Review of AD migration tools
Aelita Enterprise Suite, Mission Critical OnePoint Domain Admin., FastLane DM/Suite. Network World, 8/16/99.

Closing the Active Directory gap
Things to think about before you make the move from NT 4.0 domains to Active Directory. Network World, 6/28/99.

Windows users get directory help
IT executives last week finally saw Microsoft budge slightly on the issue of supporting access to Active Directory features from legacy Windows clients. Network World, 12/6/99.

Prudential forced to work around Active Directory
Laura Gashlin would like nothing better than to slash Microsoft's Active Directory to pieces. It's not that the systems director for Prudential Insurance doesn't like the forthcoming directory; she just wants to divide it into separate parts for security and administrative reasons. Network World, 12/6/99.

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