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Apple Snow Leopard Server: A faster, smoother breed of cat

Mac OS X 10.6 features several new collaboration, multimedia applications

By Tom Henderson and Brendan Allen, ExtremeLabs, Network World
November 02, 2009 12:00 AM ET

Network World - On the surface, Apple's Snow Leopard Server feels like a $499 maintenance release, but underneath, there's much more – improved performance, more polish and new apps focused on collaboration and content sharing.


How we tested Apple Leopard server
Archive of Network World tests
What we love/hate about Apple Snow Leopard Server

 


Apple's new installation routine for Snow Leopard (Mac OS X 10.6) improves upon Leopard's (Mac OS X 10.5) Easy and Advanced installation choices. With Snow Leopard, choices are clearer, and fresh installations usually make prudent default choices.

We easily installed the new Address Book Server, updated Mail, a new Mobile Access Server, WiKi service, an iCal(endaring) server, iChat server, filesharing and backup server (an update to Apple’s Time Machine software). After the applications are installed, we had to configure service, users, groups, and the like on a fresh installation, but an upgrade from Leopard requires little settings work.

We were happy to find tough password policies available for user accounts, but not so pleased to find that the administrator password could be very weak by default.

The Address Book server app, which allows multiple computers to share contacts, is new. It joins with directory services (Apple’s Open Directory, and Microsoft's Active Directory via open source Samba) rather than be an extension of Open Directory. Address Book is compatible with Zimbra open source e-mail, and is modeled after WebDAV, as an XML-based extension of the venerable vCard. It stores vCards outside of the directory service.

The Address Book server isn't backwards compatible with Leopard, because the protocol it's based on, CardDAV, didn't exist when Leopard was developed. Users can merge their contacts into the server easily enough — if they're Snow Leopard users.

Apple adds a new service to Snow Leopard, the Mobile Access server. A "VPN-less" authenticated/encrypted entry method that's designed to sync iPhones, Mac clients, to their address books, mail, and other internal resources. Advanced connections can be completed through Apple's L2TP/IPSec-based (or old-fashioned PPTP) VPN connectivity.

Similarly, another new app, the iPhone Configuration utility, can provision and synchronize a fleet of iPhones. As we don't use iPhones, we were unable to test the Mobile Access Server's iPhone accessibility and the applications sadly don't work with other mobile operating systems, although third parties may be able to offer this for other phones in the future. Nonetheless, it's the first time any of the operating system vendors have paid much attention to fleet mobile/cell provisioning, aside from RIM's primitive BlackBerry message servers.

Podcast Producer 2 is an updated server app that benefits from Apple's Xgrid compute clustering application. Xgrid processes workflows (often things such as media encoding) either on the host server or on other Apple MacOS machines.

In MacOS 10.5, Xgrid is difficult to make workable on distributed Mac (server or client) hardware unless one has advanced integration skills — and is willing to troubleshoot error logs until the application works. On Leopard, it took us nearly a day to work through and troubleshoot all of the elements of the distributed processing of Podcast Producer and Xgrid.

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