You don't know tech: The InfoWorld news quiz

Jan. 14, 2011: Verizon on iPhone's horizon; new Android versions rising

Yes, yes, we know: There's a new iPhone available. Or at least a semi-new one. Verizon's entry into formerly exclusive AT&T territory was not the week's only news, though you might not know it from the wall-to-wall coverage. What else happened? Google's got yet another sweet release of Android in the works. Twitter released the names of people sought by U.S. authorities in the ever-expanding WikiLeaks case. Apple and Microsoft are fighting again, this time over trademarks. And Congress is leaping once again into the online piracy fray (so take cover). Got the skills to best our quizmaster? Give yourself 10 points for each correct answer. Now put down that smartphone and get started.

1. Step aside, AT&T, there's a new iPhone sheriff in town. Which of the following features does the Verizon iPhone have that the AT&T one doesn't?

a. CDMA antennab. FaceTime videoc. "Retina" displayd. White case

2. Meanwhile, rumors swirl of yet another version of Android that will follow on the heels of its next release, Honeycomb. What's this one's sugary code name?

a. Mars Bar

b. Cotton Candy

c. Ice Cream Sandwich

d. Marzipan

3. Twitter found itself on the business end of a confidential U.S. Justice Department subpoena requesting information about a half-dozen user accounts associated with the WikiLeaks scandal. Which of the following was not among the feds' persons of interest?

a. Birgitta Jónsdóttir

b. Jacob Appelbaum

c. Rop Gonggrijp

d. Dirk Meyer

4. Which Microsoft lifer just got shown the door by Steve Ballmer?

a. Dirk Meyer

b. Robert Muglia

c. Steven Elop

d. Rop Gonggrijp

5. "For any Silicon Valley company, the most important thing is the company. And any great founders need to get out of the way of the company. We presented a spark with an idea. We saw a lot of the direction being driven by our users, and a lot of what we have to do now demand very, very specific management. And we know our strengths. And that’s mainly it. This company is bigger than any individual." Who considers himself a company man, first and foremost?

a. Jack Dorsey

b. Marc Pincus

c. Larry Page

d. Dirk Meyer

6. Sega is introducing a new gaming platform in Japan strictly for men's rooms. What is it called?

a. Potty Animal

b. You're in Luck

c. The Toylet

d. Flush With Excitement

7. Apple wants to trademark yet another common term of art, and this time Microsoft is trying to stop it. What phrase does Apple claim as solely its own?

a. Smart Phone

b. App Store

c. Pinch Zoom

d. Voice Mail

8. Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) has revived the COICA bill, which would give the feds more tools in the fight against online piracy. What does COICA stand for?

a. Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act

b. Combating Online Information and Copyright Act

c. Combating Online Infringement and Censorship Act

d. Congress Out of Its Collective mind (again) Act

9. Who says bugs don't pay? Google just handed out a record bounty to a happy geek who reported a bug in Google Chrome. How much did they pay?

a. $1,337

b. $3,133

c. $3,333

d. $6,666

10. Take the number of MySpace employees laid off this week by News Corp. and multiply by the number of copyright pirates arrested by Chinese authorities this week in advance of President Hu Jintao's visit to the United States. Add the number of websites added in 2010, according to Royal Pingdom. Put that in your opium pipe and ... what was the question again?

a. 2,340,000

b. 23,400,000

c. 234,000,000

d. 2,340,000,000

Answers

Question 1: Step aside, AT&T, there's a new iPhone sheriff in town. Which of the following features does the Verizon iPhone have that the AT&T one doesn't?

Correct Answer: CDMA antenna

The new iPhone supports Verizon's Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) 3G network, instead of AT&T's more widely supported GSM standard. It also allows you to create mobile hotspots -- not available on AT&T's phone, at least at press time -- but lacks the AT&T network's ability to handle simultaneous voice and data. Otherwise, they appear to be much the same phone. No word yet on whether you'll need to hold it in a very special way to keep your calls from dropping.

Question 2: Meanwhile, rumors swirl of yet another version of Android that will follow on the heels of its next release, Honeycomb. What's this one's sugary code name?

Correct Answer: Ice Cream Sandwich

Continuing Google's highly caloric naming condition, ICS will allegedly follow Honeycomb, which succeeded Gingerbread, Froyo (frozen yogurt), Eclair, Donut, and Cupcake, respectively. Get the feeling they need to refill the snack machines at the Googleplex more often?

Question 3: Twitter found itself on the business end of a confidential U.S. Justice Department subpoena requesting information about a half-dozen user accounts associated with the WikiLeaks scandal. Which of the following was not among the feds' persons of interest?

Correct Answer: Dirk Meyer

Of the unknown companies the U.S. government has presumably slapped with secret court orders in the WikiLeaks case, Twitter is apparently the only one that fought for (and won) the right to make the requests public. The targets include a member of Iceland's parliament (Jónsdóttir), a U.S. hacker and one-time WikiLeaks spokesperson (Appelbaum), a Dutch computer programmer (Gonggrijp) and, of course, Army Private First Class Bradley Manning and Australian Leaker First Class Julian Assange (but not newly resigned ex-AMD CEO Meyer). Leading to the inevitable question: What did WikiLeaks tweet, and when was it retweeted?

Question 4: Which Microsoft lifer just got shown the door by Steve Ballmer?

Correct Answer: Robert Muglia

In a surprise move, the 23-year Microsoft veteran and head of the company's Server and Tools Business was the recipient of a "thanks for doing such a great job, now clean out your desk" memo this week, from Steve Ballmer. Muglia will hang around until the summer while Microsoft digs up his replacement. Hey, it could have been worse. Ballmer could have strapped him to a Herman Miller chair and thrown him out the window.

Question 5: "For any Silicon Valley company, the most important thing is the company. And any great founders need to get out of the way of the company. We presented a spark with an idea. We saw a lot of the direction being driven by our users, and a lot of what we have to do now demand very, very specific management. And we know our strengths. And that’s mainly it. This company is bigger than any individual." Who considers himself a company man, first and foremost?

Correct Answer: Jack Dorsey

In an interview with PBS's Charlie Rose, the third co-founder of Twitter (and first human to ever send a tweet) discussed the origins of Twitter, his payments startup Square, and how complicated it is to build something simple. Ironically, it took him somewhat more than 140 characters to do it.

Question 6: Sega is introducing a new gaming platform in Japan strictly for men's rooms. What is it called?

Correct Answer: The Toylet

We kid you not. According to the Daily Mail, the game consoles sit atop urinals and are controlled exactly the way you think they'd be controlled. Players are rewarded for the strength, accuracy, and duration of their micturation; games include "wash the graffiti off the wall" and "lift the woman's skirt." The consoles are slated to be installed in Japan's metro stations in a few weeks. We understand the games may be difficult to master at first, but after a few trips to the loo you turn into a real whiz.

Question 7: Apple wants to trademark yet another common term of art, and this time Microsoft is trying to stop it. What phrase does Apple claim as solely its own?

Correct Answer: App Store

Apple filed for a trademark on "app store" in 2008; this week, Microsoft asked the USPTO to deny the request, claiming that the phrase is too generic. Amazingly, Apple has responded by saying that "app" stands not only for "application" but also for "Apple" -- and thus, belongs uniquely to the company. We're still waiting for Apple to sue CareerBuilder and Monster.com over ownership of the word "Jobs."

Question 8: Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) has revived the COICA bill, which would give the feds more tools in the fight against online piracy. What does COICA stand for?

Correct Answer: Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act

If passed, COICA would allow the U.S. government to seize the domains of sites suspected of committing digital piracy, before having to prove that piracy was actually committed. Narrowly blocked from passage last fall, the bill is supported by the movie and music industries and opposed by the usual privacy and civil rights groups. If there's anything Hollywood loves, it's a sequel -- even if 95 percent of them suck.

Question 9: Who says bugs don't pay? Google just handed out a record bounty to a happy geek who reported a bug in Google Chrome. How much did they pay?

Correct Answer: $3,133

Researcher Sergey Glazunov earned that amount for locating a critical bug in how Google's browser handles speech input. He received a total of $7,470 for locating that and four other lesser bugs, though we're pretty sure he'd have done it all for free. If we had $3,133 for every critical bug found in a Microsoft product, we'd probably be able to buy Google.

Question 10: Take the number of MySpace employees laid off this week by News Corp. and multiply by the number of copyright pirates arrested by Chinese authorities this week in advance of President Hu Jintao's visit to the United States. Add the number of websites added in 2010, according to Royal Pingdom. Put that in your opium pipe and ... what was the question again?

Correct Answer: 23,400,000

News Corp. informed approximately 500 employees that MySpace is no longer their space. Chinese authorities rounded up some 4,000 copyright bandits this week. Some 21,400,000 websites were born last year, per Internet bean counters Royal Pingdom. So 500 * 4K + 21.4M = 23,400,000. With 4,000 copyright scofflaws behind bars, that leaves China with only 1,299,999,996 to go. Come back next week for another copy righteous quiz.

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