Apple wins injunction against Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Australia

Apple's legal efforts against Samsung have already started to bear fruit in countries like Germany and the Netherlands, but Apple's biggest victory yet was just handed down in Australia where the Federal Court granted Apple's request for an injunction against Samsung's Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet.

Apple's legal efforts against Samsung have already started to bear fruit in countries like Germany and the Netherlands, but Apple's biggest victory yet was just handed down in Australia where the Federal Court granted Apple's request for an injunction against Samsung's Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet.

In her ruling, Justice Annabelle Bennet said Apple had a "prima facie case that Samsung had infringed two of its patents relating to touch screens and the gestures that control them."

Apple's legal team has been working hard to protect its intellectual property from what it views as blatant misappropriation from Samsung's mobile division. Indeed, Apple's legal battle against Samsung spans 4 continents and encompasses lawsuits in 12 countries.

A few weeks ago, Samsung was hoping to avoid an adverse decision by offering Apple a compromise. While details remain murky, it's believed Samsung offered to tweak its Android software just enough to satisfy Apple and get its tablet out on the market in time for Christmas. Obviously, Apple rejected this offer, clearly feeling confident in its legal case in Australia. Explaining its position, Apple lawyer Steven Burley said of the rejection - "The main reason we are here is to prevent the launch (of the Galaxy tablet) and maintain the status quo.”

Commenting on their legal setback, Samsung issued the following statement.

Samsung will continue its legal proceeding against Apple's claim in order to ensure our innovative products remain available to consumers.

This is a part of our ongoing legal proceeding against Apple's claim. Samsung is also confident it can prove Apple's violation of Samsung's wireless technology patents through a cross-claim filed on September 16, 2011 with the Federal Court of Australia, New South Wales.

 

Our wireless standard patents are essential for mobile business. We will continue to legally assert our intellectual property rights against those who violate Samsung's patents and free ride on our technology.

Thus far, things aren't looking to good for Samsung. In addition to the recent ruling in Australia, you might remember that Samsung has also suffered similar legal setbacks in Germany and the Netherlands where injunctions are temporarily in place with respect to various members of Samsung's Galaxy line of tablets and smartphones.

via Sydney Morning Herald

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