Tim Cook and Larry Page invovled in (not so) secret discussions

Given Apple's $1 billion verdict against Samsung, one might assume that Apple's legal battles with Samsung and other purveyors of Android might be closer to completion than ever before

Given Apple's $1 billion verdict against Samsung, one might assume that Apple's legal battles with Samsung and other purveyors of Android might be closer to completion than ever before. But the truth is that Samsung and Apple are still duking it out in a number of jurisdictions across the world, not to mention the fact that Samsung will undoubtedly appeal the jury verdict that came in last week.

But as Apple's legal docket remains as busy as ever, with ongoing suits against HTC, Motorola, and of course Samsung, a report surfaced earlier this week from Reuters claiming that Apple CEO Tim Cook has been engaged in discussions with Google's Larry Page over a wide range of issues, including Apple's IP concerns with Google's Android.

The two executives had a phone conversation last week, the sources said. Discussions involving lower-level officials of the two companies are also ongoing.

Page and Cook are expected to talk again in the coming weeks, though no firm date has been set, the sources said on Thursday. One of the sources told Reuters that a meeting had been scheduled for this Friday, but had been delayed for reasons that were unclear.

The two companies are keeping lines of communication open at a high level against the backdrop of Apple's legal victory in a patent infringement case against Samsung, which uses Google's Android software.

This report was subsequently corroborated by All Things D which added that another meeting between the two Tech CEOs is planned sometime soon. While there's no way to know if mutually beneficial agreement between the two companies will emerge from said talks, it has to be encouraging that the two sides are at the very least talking. There is a lot at stake in these patent battles and of course it would make things a whole lot easier if Google and Apple could figure out a way to address their concerns outside of the courtroom.

In the meantime, Apple's efforts to rid its iOS homescreen of all Google-influence is about complete. When iOS 6 drops the Maps app will be the result of homegrown efforts from Apple, not to mention the fact that YouTube for the first time won't be making an iOS homescreen appearance.

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