How we tested virtual management products

We tested each VM product along with its principal management console options on an gigabit switched network utilizing a primary VM hosting platform consisting of an HP 585 with four dual-core AMD 64-bit CPUs and 4GB of memory per CPU card.

We tested each virtual-machine product along with its principal management-console options on an gigabit-switched network using a primary virtual-machine hosting platform consisting of an HP 585 with four dual-core AMD 64-bit CPUs and 4GB of memory per CPU card.

We tested each product's basic installation of hypervisors and then examined how resources were presented to virtual-machine guests. We used guest operating systems consisting of both patched SUSE Linux Enterprise 10 and Windows 2003 Enterprise Server R2.

We performed migration testing (physical server to virtual machine) using an Dell PowerEdge 1950 server with generic installations of the operating systems, noting both the basic requirements, then used each vendor's management consoles to automate the tasks.

We noted how each product makes physical to virtual conversion of server instances, as well as virtual to virtual-server instances.

Each management console was installed to test features such as image management, monitoring, administrative, security, patching/state coherency status, and virtual-machine control.

We also crashed virtual machines, made them misbehave (example: trying to cause CPU-use misbehavior) to see how quickly the consoles reacted to these incidences and how fast we could restore virtual machines.


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