Chapter 10: Migration Strategies

Cisco Press

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Sequence

Due (By EoB)

Owner

Action

1

1/31/2006

Team 1

Check out-of-bound access/dial for all IDCs.

2

1/31/2006

Team 1

Shut and make passive all Gigabit Ethernet links to the corporate network from the respective MAN gateways connecting to IDCs.

3

1/31/2006

Team 1

Ensure that the MPLS cloud learns only expected routes, such as core IDCs.

4

1/31/2006

Team 1

Issue no shut and no passive commands on one Gigabit Ethernet link to leak the corporate address into the new MPLS network.

5

1/31/2006

Team 1

Ensure that the MPLS cloud learns only expected routes, such as core IDCs and corporate routes.

6

1/31/2006

Team 1

Check that internal support can reach all devices (monitor at P6).

7

1/31/2006

Team 1

Commence operations to drive cleanup and accept configs.

8

1/31/2006

Team 1

Tweak metrics for MPLS cutover so that routing works as expected during the transition.

9

1/31/2006

Team 1

Document and report change/variance (including the procedure to isolate the core).

10

1/31/2006

Team 1

Conduct a team status meeting to discuss the success so far. Assign remedial actions to address any issues that may be apparent.

11

1/31/2006

Team 1

Decide whether to proceed with the current plan or amend it.

12

2/1/2006

Team 1

Perform a health check of the network during a maintenance window.

Phase 3

Phase 3 involves rolling out the network implementation to all locations. There may be many sets of procedures for sites of differing sizes and complexity; however, the aim is to produce a reasonable set of procedures that can be replicated in each site with similar requirements. Some suggested details for this phase appear in the section "On-Site Implementation."

Phase 4

Phase 4, the final phase, defines the activities to be completed post-cutover and includes the items covered in Table 10-3. This phase should be executed as a rolling activity because the installation progresses through all geographies and sites the new network will reach.

Table 10-3 Typical Phase 4 Implementation Planning Tasks

Sequence

Due (by EoB)

Owner

Action

1

2/15/2006

Team 2

Routing team verifies operation and signs off.

2

2/15/2006

Team 2

QoS team verifies operation and signs off.

3

2/15/2006

Team 2

Multicast team verifies operation and signs off.

4

2/15/2006

Team 2

Network management team verifies operation and signs off.

5.

2/14/2006

Team 1

Conduct a daily/weekly technical review with service providers.

6

2/15/2006

Team 2

Document and summary report from each technology team lead (assess whether more time is needed).

6.1

2/15/2006

Team 1

Conduct a network performance call with the provider.

7

2/15/2006

Team 1

Compile a migration report and assess the migration strategy with respect to moving forward.

8

2/16/2006

Team 2

Health check by the operations team.

9

2/16/2006

Team 2

Outstanding testing that may be required.

On-Site Implementation

This section discusses the required tasks to survey a site ahead of installation and lists the tasks for a circuit activation check. Clearly, after all the communications testing and as soon as the new links and routers can be monitored by network management systems, a final check is required that checks all applications from the user's perspective.

The site survey is important to plan what needs to be done during the installation for each site. The investment in a properly executed pre-installation survey is well worth the payback in terms of a smooth installation experience. Table 10-4 shows a list of things to consider.

Table 10-4 Typical Site Survey Requirements

Site Location: Site 1

Status

1.0: Site address and contact information

Names, phone numbers, hours of access, and out-of-hours contact information.

2.0: Environmental

Cabling, power supply type, and cabinet space.

3.0: Electrical

AC or DC power, power receptacle type, and location of power outlets to equipment.

4.0: Cabling

Under the floor or overhead, restrictions, cable labeling scheme, and the kind of cabling required.

5.0: Telco interface

Location of wallboard/demarc, interface type, who can terminate cables to the demarc, circuit type, ID and in-service date.

6.0: Data applications

List applications to be available at this site, such as Frame Relay, asynchronous, optical connections, and so on.

7.0: Voice applications

Specify PBX and signaling types.

8.0: Network management

Are console terminals available? Will there be a maintenance printer? Where will the dial-in modem be connected?

After all this information is gathered and analyzed and has resulted in the appropriate orders and shipping of equipment, it's time to install the equipment and verify its operation. Typically, the provider installs at least up to the demarc point, with likely installation of the routers themselves and the channel service unit/digital service unit (CSU/DSU) if it is not already built into the router.

The following addresses concepts for verifying circuit and communications activation. As stated previously, as soon as all communications are verified, a final user test of all applications' operation is required before the site is considered complete in terms of migration and is accepted by the enterprise.

By whatever means the enterprise is comfortable using, the circuit must be deemed to be clean, which means that error rates on the line are within design limits. Typically, this is achieved by performing a Bit Error Rate Test (BERT) for several hours. A BERT ensures that the circuit is working properly by testing for the following:

  • Packet loss across the carrier backbone must be what was contracted for all data classes.

  • Latency characteristics, as defined in the SLA, must be met.

  • New links need to deliver the expected bandwidth paid for.

In the event of a link or PVC failure of the new circuit, restoration has to be provided within the contracted guidelines via an alternative path within the provider's network (if available).

Case Study Selections

For the case study used throughout this book, the forms and processes defined are close to those used by Acme. The RFP, detailed design document, site planning, and site completion milestones were the primary checkpoints in monitoring the migration progress.

The primary selection made during the early stages that affected the network design directly was when different providers were used in different geographies. In those situations, Acme decided to place its own router between the two providers to handle IP connectivity.

Interprovider solutions would allow multiple providers to collaborate and provide seamless service without requiring this additional handoff, but political issues seem to be the cause of preventing that from happening at this point.

Summary

Based on the information in this chapter, you now have a good idea of what to write up as a table of contents for your RFP, and you know how that relates to the SLAs you require for network, installation, and repair performance. You now also understand that, after vendors are selected, the critical document is the detailed design that specifies how both you and the service provider will deliver the end service. Finally, you understand the training require-ments for operations, and you have the suggested site planning and completion forms.

Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

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