Why did Microsoft sack CIO?

You'll get no inside dirt from me, at least not yet, but the 'Net is abuzz this morning with speculation regarding the sudden and essentially unexplained dismissal of Microsoft CIO Stuart Scott.

Most of the chatter is of the mocking and tin-foil-hat varieties involving iPhones and Linux, but some people out there really do know what happened and to these people I have a simple message: I'm here, I'm listening and I'll go to jail before giving up an unnamed source (provided it's one of those cushy white-collar jails). The address is buzz@nww.com.

(Update: It took a bit to jar the name out of the memory bank, but this episode with Scott is reminiscent of the departure of Martin Taylor, a Microsoft marketing exec better known for being a big-time buddy of CEO Steve Balmer.)

(Update 2: If you're looking for a comprehensive selection of the humorous reasons being offered, might I suggest this Slashdot thread … and caution you to keep your expectations low.)

(Update 3: Todd Bishop at the Seattle P-I let's us know that Scott's home has been on the market for a month-and-a-half, an indication that perhaps his firing was not a bolt out of the blue -- or an indication of perhaps nothing. The house is worth north of $3 million, so at least we won't have to be taking up a collection for the guy.)

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