Sandra Henry-Stocker

Unix Dweeb

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Sandra Henry-Stocker has been administering Unix systems for more than 30 years. She describes herself as "USL" (Unix as a second language) but remembers enough English to write books and buy groceries. She lives in the mountains in Virginia where, when not working with or writing about Unix, she's chasing the bears away from her bird feeders.

The opinions expressed in this blog are those of Sandra Henry-Stocker and do not necessarily represent those of IDG Communications, Inc., its parent, subsidiary or affiliated companies.

The power of >, >>, &, &&, and || on Linux

The power of >, >>, &, &&, and || on Linux

The >, >>, &, && and || characters are extremely useful whenever you're working on the Linux command line.

Creating a directory tree with a single command

Creating a directory tree with a single command

The mkdir command can create not just a directory but also a complex directory structure if you ask in the right way.

Getting help on Linux

Getting help on Linux

There are a lot of ways to get help on Linux, especially when you're getting started and want to learn a number of important commands.

Finding files on Linux in all sorts of ways

Finding files on Linux in all sorts of ways

There a quite a few ways to narrow your search when trying to find files on a Linux system.

Using PuTTY to connect to Linux

Using PuTTY to connect to Linux

PuTTY can do a lot more than allow you to log into Linux from another system. It also allows you to tailor your window in several ways.

Sharing, compressing and password-protecting files on Linux

Sharing, compressing and password-protecting files on Linux

Linux provides a number of ways to control who has access to your files and what kind of access they have.

Using aliases on Linux

Using aliases on Linux

Setting up aliases on Linux systems can save you a lot of time and trouble on the command line. This post shows how to set up and manage aliases and provides a number of examples on how and why to use them.

Waiting for things to happen on Linux

Waiting for things to happen on Linux

If you don't want to stop everything you're doing to wait for some other Linux workload to complete, custom scripts and the bash wait built-in can set you free.

Resizing images on the Linux command line

Resizing images on the Linux command line

The convert command (part of ImageMagick) can change the resolution of image files faster than you can count to F in hex.

How to quickly make minor changes to complex Linux commands

How to quickly make minor changes to complex Linux commands

Linux provides a number of easy ways to move back and forth on the command line, make minor changes, and execute the altered command.

Taking advantage of the grep command's many options

The grep command offers interesting options to help you find what you want from text files.

Four ways to view files and file permissions on Linux

Four ways to view files and file permissions on Linux

Viewing the content of files and examining access permissions and such are very different options. This post examines a number of ways to look at files on Linux.

Exploring bash builtins on Linux

Here's how to learn about the many bash builtins you might be unfamiliar with.

Understanding Linux file system types

Understanding Linux file system types

Linux systems use a variety of file systems with very different strengths and benefits.

How to create netstat aliases to help focus on network activity

How to create netstat aliases to help focus on network activity

The netstat command can display an overwhelming amount of network statistics. Ready to make your focus a little easier with a series of aliases?

Using the Linux ncdu command to view your disk usage

Using the Linux ncdu command to view your disk usage

The ncdu command provides a convenient way to review files and the disk space being used on Linux systems, but the file sizes may appear a little strange at first.

Verifying bash script arguments

Verifying bash script arguments

Check out how you can ensure that proper arguments are passed to your bash scripts.

Recording your commands on the Linux command line

Recording your commands on the Linux command line

Linux offers a couple of easy ways to record commands you type so that you can review or rerun them.

Counting and modifying lines, words and characters in Linux text files

Counting and modifying lines, words and characters in Linux text files

A series of commands ranging from simple to fairly complex will help you count lines, words or individual characters on the Linux command line.

Using the at command to schedule tasks on Linux

Using the at command to schedule tasks on Linux

The at command allows you to run a task on a Linux system at any time or date you specify.

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