Sandra Henry-Stocker

Unix Dweeb

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Sandra Henry-Stocker has been administering Unix systems for more than 30 years. She describes herself as "USL" (Unix as a second language) but remembers enough English to write books and buy groceries. She lives in the mountains in Virginia where, when not working with or writing about Unix, she's chasing the bears away from her bird feeders.

The opinions expressed in this blog are those of Sandra Henry-Stocker and do not necessarily represent those of IDG Communications, Inc., its parent, subsidiary or affiliated companies.

Making better use of your Linux logs

The future of networking: Open source networking is the 'new norm'

The future of networking: Open source networking is the 'new norm'

Open source networking has become the "new norm," and many at the recent Open Networking Summit Europe said they’re seeing it play out in the industry.

Fedora Project announces availability of Fedora 29 beta

Fedora Project announces availability of Fedora 29 beta

The Fedora 29 beta release is ready for downloading and testing, including new support for containers and better performance on Arm machines.

Why Linux users should try Rust

Why Linux users should try Rust

Installing the Rust programming language on your Linux systems could turn out to be one of the more rewarding things you've done in years.

How to list repositories on Linux

How to list repositories on Linux

Use these commands to get insights on repositories that contain OS updates and applications and how that information is stored on your system.

Linux tricks that can save you time and trouble

Linux tricks that can save you time and trouble

Some command line tricks can make you even more productive on the Linux command line.

How to pin a pile of addresses onto a Google map

How to pin a pile of addresses onto a Google map

How to take a list of names, addresses, phone numbers and email addresses and turn it into a Google map.

 Linux kernel 4.18: Better security, leaner code

Linux kernel 4.18: Better security, leaner code

The latest version of the Linux kernel cleans out nearly 100K lines of code, adds file encryption and the Berkeley Packet Filter, plus makes a nod to gamers and mobile devices.

Is the Linux 4.18 kernel heading your way?

Is the Linux 4.18 kernel heading your way?

The recently released 4.18 Linux kernel has already moved up to 4.18.5. How soon it lands on your system or network depends a lot on which Linux distributions you use.

How the L1 Terminal Fault vulnerability affects Linux systems

How the L1 Terminal Fault vulnerability affects Linux systems

The L1 Terminal Fault (L1TF) affects Intel processors and thereby Linux systems. Learn what this vulnerability is all about and what Linux users should do about it.

Examining partitions on Linux systems

Examining partitions on Linux systems

Linux systems provide many ways to look at disk partitions. Here's a look at commands you can use to display useful information -- each providing a different format and with a different focus.

How to display data in a human-friendly way on Linux

How to display data in a human-friendly way on Linux

Many Linux commands now have options to make their output a little easier to digest. Here's a look at some that bring out the friendliness of our favorite operating system.

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