Sandra Henry-Stocker

Unix Dweeb

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Sandra Henry-Stocker has been administering Unix systems for more than 30 years. She describes herself as "USL" (Unix as a second language) but remembers enough English to write books and buy groceries. She lives in the mountains in Virginia where, when not working with or writing about Unix, she's chasing the bears away from her bird feeders.

The opinions expressed in this blog are those of Sandra Henry-Stocker and do not necessarily represent those of IDG Communications, Inc., its parent, subsidiary or affiliated companies.

Navigating your Linux files with ranger

Recovering deleted files on Linux with testdisk

Recovering deleted files on Linux with testdisk

This post describes testdisk, one of the tools that comes in handy for recovering recently deleted files (along with fixing partitions in other ways).

How to view information on your Linux devices with lshw

How to view information on your Linux devices with lshw

The lshw (list hardware) command on Linux systems provides a lot more information on system devices than most of us might imagine is available.

Using bash’s shopt builtin to manage Linux shell behavior

Using bash’s shopt builtin to manage Linux shell behavior

The shopt builtin offers 53 settings that can alter how bash behaves. Read this post and then refer to bash's man page to follow up on how these settings might work for you.

Using the Linux stat command to create flexible file listings

Using the Linux stat command to create flexible file listings

The stat command isn't only for looking at file details one file at a time. It can also be used to create file listings that contain just the information you want to see – with considerably more than an ls -l command.

Enhancing the Linux command line with aliases

Enhancing the Linux command line with aliases

Using bash aliases in Linux can save time and having to remember complex commands - and it can be fun, too.

11  ways to list and sort files on Linux

11 ways to list and sort files on Linux

Linux commands can provide details on files and show options for customizing file listings, but can also reach as deeply into a file system as you care to look.

Managing process accounting on Linux

Managing process accounting on Linux

Process accounting can provide a lot of details that can help monitor user and system activity on Linux. Here's a look at how it works and what kind of data it provides.

Word game: Finding anadromes with Linux

Word game: Finding anadromes with Linux

Using Linux commands to find words that, when reversed, turn into other words turned out to be an enjoyable mental challenge. How many can you find?

Merging and sorting files on Linux

Merging and sorting files on Linux

There are quite a few ways to merge and sort text files on Linux. The command to choose depends on your data and your preferences.

Linux dominates supercomputing

Linux dominates supercomputing

The Linux operating system runs all 500 of the world’s fastest supercomputers, which help to advance artificial intelligence, machine learning and even COVID-19 research.

Digging for DNS answers on Linux

Digging for DNS answers on Linux

Dig is a powerful and flexible tool for interrogating domain name system (DNS) servers. In this post, we’ll take a deep dive into how it works and what it can tell you.

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