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How to use the script command: 2-Minute Linux Tips

Network World | May 15, 2020

How to use the script command to capture a series of commands that you run along with any output that they generate. This be helpful when you are documenting a process or testing a series of commands.

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Hi, this is Sandra Henry-Stocker, author of the “Unix as a Second Language” blog on NetworkWorld.
In this Linux tip, we’re going to look at the script command that can be used to capture a series of commands that you run along with any output that they generate. This be helpful when you are documenting a process or testing a series of commands.
To start recording, type “script” followed by the name of the file you want to generate. If you don’t specify a filename, the file will be called “typescript”.
Now, let’s run some commands:
Once you’ve run the commands that you want to capture along with their output, enter ^D (hold the Ctrl key and press “d”) to stop collecting commands and their output.
As you can see from the file listing below, test1 is now the newest file and has captured some data:
Look at the file and you should see the commands and output along with timestamps that show when you started and ended collecting the data:
That’s your Linux tip for the script command.
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