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How to use the lscpu command: 2-Minute Linux Tips

Network World | Oct 2, 2020

In this Linux tip, we’re going to look at the lscpu command that provides a lot of information on your system’s CPU or CPUs.

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Hi, this is Sandra Henry-Stocker, author of the “Unix as a Second Language” blog on NetworkWorld.
In this Linux tip, we’re going to look at the lscpu command that provides a lot of information on your system’s CPU or CPUs. And when I say “a lot”, I mean “a LOT!” Here’s an example:
Parsing that much information can take a lot of time. We can see that this system has two 64-bit CPUs and the speeds reported in MHz. That’s often important to know when you’re planning to install software. They’re Intel CPUs and we can see their maximum speed along with a lot of other information.
It can be helpful to see some reported vulnerabilities and precautions that have been deployed to mitigate them. For example, the Meltdown vulnerability is mitigated by page-table isolation (PTI). We also see a long series of “flags” that report various capabilities of the system, though you’ll have to look them up to know what each one means.
To get you started, the first three in this list tell us that these CPUs provide: fpu: Onboard FPU (floating point support) vme: Virtual 8086 mode enhancements de: Debugging Extensions (CR4.DE)
That’s your Linux tip for the lscpu command. If you have questions or would like to suggest a topic, please add a comment below. And don’t forget to subscribe to the IDG Tech(talk) channel on YouTube.
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