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How to use the blkid command: 2-Minute Linux Tips

Network World | Apr 16, 2021

In this Linux tip, learn how to use the blkid command. It gives you a very useful view of block devices on your Linux system. First, it shows the devices (e.g., /dev/sda1). It shows the UUIDs (the 128 bit long "universally unique identifiers") associated with each of them, the block sizes, the file system types and, when available, the PARTUUIDs.

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Hi, this is Sandra Henry-Stocker, author of the “Unix as a Second Language” blog on NetworkWorld.
In this Linux tip, we’re going to look at the blkid command. It gives you a very useful view of block devices on your Linux system. Here's an example:
So, what does this show us? First, it shows the devices (e.g., /dev/sda1). It shows the UUIDs (the 128 bit long "universally unique identifiers") associated with each of them, the block sizes, the file system types and, when available, the PARTUUIDs.
Looking at /dev/sda2, for example, we see that it's a btrfs file system. This is a modern fault-tolerant file system type that some Linux systems (like Fedora) now use.
On this system, we have one btrfs file system, two ext4 file systems, one exfat file system and swap.
The blkid output complements what we get from df -k.
That’s your Linux tip for the blkid command.
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