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How to use the traceroute command: 2-Minute Linux Tips

Network World | May 14, 2021

In this Linux tip, learn how to use the traceroute command. It reports on the route taken to reach a remote system and provides timing details for each "hop" along the way (the time between routers).

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Hi, this is Sandra Henry-Stocker, author of the “Unix as a Second Language” blog on NetworkWorld.
In this Linux tip, we’re going to look at the traceroute command. It reports on the route taken to reach a remote system and provides timing details for each "hop" along the way (the time between routers).
To use traceroute, just type "traceroute" followed by the name or IP address that you want it to reach. For example, you might see something like this:
Notice traceroute required 16 stops (router crossings) to reach the target. We see the names or IP addresses for each router along the way and the time used by each of three requests sent per router.
The sequences of asterisks indicate that the system either didn't respond quickly enough or was unable to respond to the protocol used. In any case, we can see how long it took for the requests took and maybe spot any hops that took much longer.
What you don't see is that traceroute is using time-to-live settings to get a response from each hop before it tries to reach the next one. This allows it to collect the timing details.
That’s your Linux tip for the traceroute command.
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