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How to use the bpytop command: 2-Minute Linux Tips

Network World | Nov 19, 2021

In this Linux tip, learn how to use the bpytop command. It's one of many "top" commands (like top and htop) that make it easy to gauge many aspects of system performance on Linux.

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Hi, this is Sandra Henry-Stocker, author of the “Unix as a Second Language” blog on NetworkWorld.
In this Linux tip, we’re going to look at the bpytop command. It's one of many "top" commands (like top and htop) that make it easy to gauge many aspects of system performance on Linux.
The bpytop tool is python script (so python 3.6+ must be installed on your system). To start byptop once it's installed, just type "bpytop". You should see something like this:
(full mode)
You can see this screen is organized into CPU usage, processes, memory usage and network activity.
If we click on mode:full, we will switch to another mode – mode:stat with some of the same data, but more focus on disks.
If we click on mode:stat, we will switch into mode:proc in which focuses on running processes. You can even move up and down the process list using the up and down arrows on your keyboard and, if you are running the tool with sudo privileges, can even kill processes by selecting a process and clicking on Kill at the bottom of the display.
One peculiarity of bpytop is that it starts up in whatever mode it was in when you last exited.
If you want to look at a particular aspect of performance like memory and disk usage, you can start bpytop with a command like bpytop -b "mem". Just keep in mind that it will start with that same display the next time you use it. You can go back to the original mode by typing:
$ bpytop -b "cpu mem net proc"
And always start that way if you create an alias:
$ alias bpytop=' bpytop -b "cpu mem net proc"'
There's no man page for bpytool, but you can get some help by typing:
$ bpytop --help
That’s your Linux tip for bpytop.
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