Bryan Lunduke

Bryan Lunduke began his computing life on a friend's Commodore 64, then moved on to a Franklin Ace... and then a 286 running MS-DOS. This was followed by an almost random-seeming string of operating systems: ranging from AmigaOS to OS/2, and even including MacOS 8. Eventually, Bryan tried Linux. And there he stayed. In 2006, Bryan founded the Linux Action Show - growing it into the largest Linux-centric podcast on the planet. He's also the creator of 'Linux Tycoon,' the video game about managing a Linux distribution. Today, he is a writer and works as the Social Media Marketing Manager of SUSE. On this here blog, he seeks to accomplish two goals: 1) To be the voice of reason and practicality in the Linux and Open Source world. 2) To highlight the coolest things happening throughout the world of Linux.

Lunduke’s Theory of Computer Mockery — no technology is sacred

What is MINIX? The most popular OS in the world, thanks to Intel

What is MINIX? The most popular OS in the world, thanks to Intel

MINIX is a complete operating system running within Intel chips that has total access to the machines it runs on, but users have no access to it, posing security concerns to some.

Linux command line tools for working with non-Linux users

Linux command line tools for working with non-Linux users

If you work within a Linux terminal, working with non-Linux users can be difficult. These tools help with document compatibility and companywide instant messaging.

History of computers, part 2 — TCP/IP owes a lot to Xerox PUP

History of computers, part 2 — TCP/IP owes a lot to Xerox PUP

An interview with Robert Taylor, former manager of Xerox PARC, shows TCP/IP designs were based a lot on the PARC Universal Packet (PUP) networking protocol suite.

Server downtime is bad. Server slowness is worse

Server downtime is bad. Server slowness is worse

A server going down can really muck things up for any business. Also problematic, and costly, though, are slow servers, databases and networks.

Time to rethink how much customer data you store

Time to rethink how much customer data you store

Companies store lots of customer data – including personally identifiable information – raising concerns about the cost to store that data, as well as the need to secure it.

Weird IP networks: Internet via birds and ham radios

Weird IP networks: Internet via birds and ham radios

When disaster strikes and internet access is knocked out, how can you communicate? Ham radios and IP over Avian Carriers are two options.

2 options for deciding open computing standards—neither is great

2 options for deciding open computing standards—neither is great

The current way open computing standards are decided is broken. Deciding what to replace it with, though, is difficult. There’s no one easy solution.

Nextcloud’s file storage solution gets a security boost

Nextcloud’s file storage solution gets a security boost

The new version of Nextcloud includes end-to-end encryption and enterprise key management.

W3C DRM appeal fails, votes kept secret

W3C DRM appeal fails, votes kept secret

The World Wide Web Consortium’s decision to keep votes about DRM secret and that it censured the EFF for “disclosing even vague sense of a vote” raises concerns.

Easy data storage services are like fast food

Easy data storage services are like fast food

Cloud storage is the fast-food way of storing data, and it will give you the IT equivalent of gastronomical distress. You’ll wish you took time to set up your own server.

History of computers, part 1 — The bulletin board system

History of computers, part 1 — The bulletin board system

Before we had always-available, fast connections to multiple servers, we had dial-up modems and bulletin board systems (BBS). And it wasn’t even that long ago.

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