10 things you need to know about MU-MIMO Wi-Fi

It’s a big breakthrough in wireless connectivity, but don’t let MU-MIMO’s limitations catch you off guard. Here are 10 ways to get up to speed on MU-MIMO Wi-Fi.

 MU-MIMO Wi-Fi.
IDG

Multi-user MIMO allows multiple Wi-Fi devices to simultaneously receive multiple data streams. For example, a wireless access point (AP) can send data to four different Wi-Fi devices at the same time. MU-MIMO can greatly increase the network's throughput and is a real asset for high density networks.

MIMO – which stands for multiple input multiple output – technology has evolved over the years since the debut of the single-user mode (SU-MIMO), which was introduced a decade ago with the 802.11n wireless standard.

The 802.11ac (Wi-Fi 5) standard introduced optional MU-MIMO in Wave 2 products. Now with the 802.11ax (Wi-Fi 6) standard, we see even more improvements to MU-MIMO. As 802.11ax wireless routers and access points (AP) hit the market, anyone who supports a Wi-Fi network will need to get educated about MU-MIMO. Read on for 10 facts that will help get you up to speed.

1. Depending on the Wi-Fi standard, MU-MIMO can be one-way or two-way

It's important to remember that, unlike SU-MIMO, MU-MIMO with 802.11ac works only with downlink wireless connections. Only wireless routers and APs are able to simultaneously send data to multiple users, whether it's one or more streams of data to each. The wireless devices themselves (such as smartphones, tablets or laptops) still must take turns sending data to the wireless router or AP, although they can individually utilize SU-MIMO to send multiple streams when it's their turn.

To continue reading this article register now

IT Salary Survey: The results are in