Nutanix offers unified data backup and recovery, allies with AMD

Nutanix Mine essentially turns a Nutanix system into a backup appliance, putting primary and secondary storage in one place.

Nutanix offers unified data backup and recovery, allies with AMD
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Nutanix is adding a data backup and recovery software package called Nutanix Mine to its hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) offerings, which integrates third-party data backup and recovery software with Nutanix’s Enterprise Cloud OS software.

This allows Nutanix customers to manage their primary and secondary data storage and backup and recovery through a single management console. Nutanix claims that Mine will streamline overall deployment and will simplify the full lifecycle of data backup operations, including ongoing management, scaling and troubleshooting.

Nutanix Mine will support a number of data backup and recovery software products, including Veeam, HYCU, Commvault, Veritas, and Unitrends.

Nutanix says that with Mine, customers will be able to converge secondary storage operations into the Nutanix Enterprise Cloud Platform to deliver intelligent data backup services for all business applications and customers can use the backup software of their choice.

Nutanix Mine is integrated with Nutanix’s Prism management console and is designed to reduce complexity in managing separate systems for data backup and recovery. It also takes advantage of Nutanix’s compression and deduplication features.

Mine essentially turns a Nutanix system into a backup appliance, putting primary and secondary storage in one place: on the Nutanix system's storage. And both primary and secondary storage are managed through the Prism console.

Nutanix partners with AMD

Nutanix is a software vendor and has partnerships with all of the major OEMs, but now it’s picking a side in the CPU battle. The company also announced it has worked with AMD to optimize Nutanix’s hyperconverged software, Acropolis OS, on AMD Epyc processors.

Nutanix supports all of the major hypervisors, but this is getting down to the system level. Teams from the two firms have been collaborating closely for several months and expect to see Nutanix-validated Epyc-based servers come to the market from leading server OEM manufacturers sometime around July, according to a blog post by Raghu Nambiar, corporate vice president and CTO of Datacenter Ecosystems & Application Engineering at AMD.

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